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Chula Vista duo indicted in fake Lyme disease cure

Postby cave76 » Sun 7 Dec 2008 18:03

Chula Vista duo indicted in fake Lyme disease cure

UNION-TRIBUNE BREAKING NEWS TEAM

12:20 p.m. December 5, 2008

SAN DIEGO – A federal grand jury in Kansas has indicted two Chula Vista residents suspected of selling bogus treatments for Lyme disease, along with a microscope they claimed would diagnose the disease.

The 25-count indictment charged Robert W. Bradford, 77, and Brigitte G. Byrd, 63, with conspiracy, mail fraud, introducing a misbranded medical device, and distributing unapproved and misbranded drugs.

The pair, along with a Topeka, Kan., doctor who lost his medical license, are accused of making more than $400,000 from the alleged conspiracy between April 2004 and August 2006, mostly through a company called CRB Inc. based in Chula Vista, according to the indictment.

In Kansas, the doctor, John R. Toth, used Bradford's microscope and his treatments. He charged patients about $100 for each use of the microscope that supposedly diagnosed Lyme disease and approximately $320 for a series of injections he called antimicrobial treatment, according to the indictment.

Bradford, the founder of CRB, claimed to be a doctor and a professor, although he is not a physician and has no science degree from an accredited university, according to the indictment.

He claimed to have invented the Lyme disease-detecting microscope and conducted human intravenous drug experiments at a hospital in Tijuana that treated the disease, according to the indictment.

If convicted, all three faces several years in federal prison and hundreds of thousands of dollars in fines.

Bradford and Byrd have not been arrested but will be told when they are to appear in court.


http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/metr ... 5lyme.html

[cave note: This was posted at LNusa. I don't know if it's been posted here, and if so, I'll delete this]

AH YES----- dear dear Dr. Bradford! :) I collected more tidbits about him a year or so ago than I could count! Whatta guy!

His 'trail' is interesting. However, he DID produce one thing of note---- the Bradford microscope. But it was all downhill from there. :D

Here is what the "great" Quackwatch says about him. (They DO get some things right.)

http://www.quackwatch.com/04ConsumerEdu ... /cfcm.html
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Re: Chula Vista duo indicted in fake Lyme disease cure

Postby rlstanley » Sun 7 Dec 2008 20:12

Cave Wrote:
The pair, along with a Topeka, Kan., doctor who lost his medical license, are accused of making more than $400,000 from the alleged conspiracy between April 2004 and August 2006, mostly through a company called CRB Inc. based in Chula Vista, according to the indictment.

In Kansas, the doctor, John R. Toth, used Bradford's microscope and his treatments. He charged patients about $100 for each use of the microscope that supposedly diagnosed Lyme disease and approximately $320 for a series of injections he called antimicrobial treatment, according to the indictment.


See the following thread for background on Toth:Bismuth injecting Lyme doctor goes to prison
.
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Re: Chula Vista duo indicted in fake Lyme disease cure

Postby rlstanley » Mon 8 Dec 2008 1:24

Another newspaper article:

Indictment says Lyme disease treatment a fraud


Indictment says Lyme disease treatment a fraud
Former Topeka physician among those charged

The Capital-Journal
Published Friday, December 5, 2008 at 9:31 a.m. CST

KANSAS CITY, Kan. — A Topeka physician who had lost his license and two California residents are charged with creating a fraudulent marketing scheme to sell medical equipment and drug treatments for a nonexistent epidemic of Lyme disease, acting U.S. Attorney Marietta Parker announced today.

A 25-count federal indictment charges the conspirators with violating the federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act by conspiring to sell a microscope that supposedly would diagnose Lyme disease and drugs that supposedly would cure the disease.

Among those charged is former Topeka physician John R. Toth, 59, who currently is in custody at Ellsworth Correctional Facility. He faces charges of conspiracy to violate the Food and Drug Act, mail fraud, introducing unapproved drugs, introducing and distributing a misbranded drug, and introducing a misbranded medical device.

In March 2008 in Shawnee County District Court, Toth was sentenced to 32 months after pleading no contest to a state charge of reckless involuntary manslaughter in the death of a patient, Beverly A. Wunder. As part of the plea agreement, he surrendered his medical license.

Also charged in the Lyme disease case are Robert W. Bradford, 77, and Brigitte G. Byrd, 63, both of Chula Vista, Calif., and C.R.B. Inc., also of Chula Vista, doing business as American Biologics.

The indictment alleges that Bradford, founder of C.R.B., Inc., claimed to be a “doctor” and a “professor,” although he wasn’t a physician and had no science degree from an accredited university. He was the inventor of the “Bradford Variable Projection Microscope,” which he claimed could be used to identify Lyme disease.

Byrd was executive vice president of C.R.B., Inc.

During the conspiracy, the indictment said, Toth was licensed as a medical doctor in Kansas, was the director of The Luke Center for Integrative Health, Inc., in Topeka and he established the Alternative Therapies Health Association.

Bradford, Byrd and C.R.B. executed a marketing plan aimed at creating demand for Bradford’s microscope and certain drugs they sold for the treatment of Lyme disease.

In fact, there was no epidemic of Lyme disease, the microscope couldn’t diagnose Lyme disease and the drugs the defendants were selling couldn’t cure Lyme disease.

According to the indictment, Bradford, Byrd and C.R.B., Inc., made more than $400,000 from the fraudulent scheme between April 2004 and August 2006.

In Topeka, Toth used Bradford’s microscope and his treatments and charged patients approximately $100 for each use of the microscope and approximately $320 for a series of injections he called “antimicrobial treatment.”



US Dept of Justice, Kansas news release:

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
News releases are available at http://www.usdoj.gov/usao/ks/press.html

Contact: Jim Cross
PHONE: 316-269-6481
FAX: 316-269-6420

Dec. 5, 2008

LYME DISEASE TREATMENT WAS FRAUD FEDERAL INDICTMENT CHARGES

Federal grand jury indicts John Toth and the suppliers of his ‘antimicrobial treatments’

KANSAS CITY, KAN. – A Topeka physician who lost his license and two California residents are charged with creating a fraudulent marketing scheme to sell medical equipment and drug treatments for a nonexistent epidemic of Lyme disease, Acting U.S. Attorney Marietta Parker announced today.

A 25-count federal indictment charges the conspirators with violating the federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act by conspiring to sell a microscope that supposedly would diagnose Lyme disease and drugs that supposedly would cure the disease. Marketing materials claimed that Lyme disease was “the plague of the 21st century” and was a contributing factor in 50 percent of all chronic illness including Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

Charged are:

John R. Toth, 59, who is in custody at Ellsworth Correctional Facility: One count of conspiracy to violate the Food and Drug Act, 8 counts of mail fraud, one count of introducing unapproved drugs, one count of introducing a misbranded drug, one count of receiving and distributing a misbranded drug, and count of introducing a misbranded medical device.

Robert W. Bradford, 77, Chula Vista, Calif.: One count of conspiracy, 8 counts of mail fraud, 5 counts of introducing unapproved drugs, 5 counts of introducing misbranded drugs, 5 counts of receiving and distributing misbranded drugs and one count of introducing a misbranded medical device.

Brigitte G. Byrd, 63, Chula Vista, Calif.: One count of conspiracy, 8 counts of mail fraud, 5 counts of introducing unapproved drugs, 4 counts of introducing misbranded drugs, 4 counts of receiving and distributing misbranded drugs and one count of introducing a misbranded medical device.

C.R.B. Inc., of Chula Vista, Calif., doing business as American Biologics: One count of conspiracy, 8 counts of mail fraud, 5 counts of introducing unapproved drugs, 4 counts of introducing misbranded drugs, 4 counts of receiving and distributing misbranded drugs and one count of introducing a misbranded medical device.

The indictment alleges that:

– Bradford, founder of C.R.B., Inc., claimed to be a “doctor” and a “professor” although he was not a physician and had no science degree from an accredited university. He was the inventor of the “Bradford Variable Projection Microscope,” which he claimed could be used to identify Lyme disease. He had conducted human intravenous drug experiments for treatment of Lyme disease at a hospital in Tijuana, Mexico.

– Byrd was executive vice president of C.R.B., Inc.

– During the conspiracy, Toth was licensed as a medical doctor in Kansas. He was the director of The Luke Center for Integrative Health, Inc., in Topeka, Kan., and he established the Alternative Therapies Health Association.

Bradford, Byrd and C.R.B., Inc., executed a marketing plan aimed at creating demand for Bradford’s microscope and certain drugs they sold for the treatment of Lyme disease. In fact, there was no epidemic of Lyme disease, the microscope could not diagnose Lyme disease and the drugs the defendants were selling could not cure Lyme disease. The Food and Drug Administration did not approve Bradford’s microscope or his treatments for Lyme disease, which included injecting patients with Bismacine, Dioxychlor Sulfoxime, and Bio-Rizin

According to the indictment, Bradford, Byrd and C.R.B., Inc., made more than $400,000 from the fraudulent scheme during a period from April 2004 to August 2006.

In Topeka, Toth used Bradford’s microscope and his treatments. Toth charged patients approximately $100 for each use of the microscope and approximately $320 for a series of injections he called “antimicrobial treatment.”

In March 2008 in Shawnee County District Court, Toth was sentenced to 32 months after pleading no contest to a state charge of reckless involuntary manslaughter in the death of a patient, Beverly A. Wunder. As part of the plea agreement, he surrendered his medical license.

Upon conviction, the federal charges carry the following penalties:

– Conspiracy: A maximum penalty of 5 years in federal prison and a fine up to $250,000.

– Mail fraud: A maximum penalty of 20 years and a fine up to $250,000.

– Introduction of an unapproved drug into interstate commerce: A maximum penalty of 3 years and a fine up to $250,000.

– Introduction of a misbranded drug into interstate commerce: A maximum penalty of 3 years and a fine up to $250,000.

– Receiving and distributing a misbranded drug: A maximum penalty of 3 years and a fine up to $250,000.
Introduction of a misbranded medical device into interstate commerce: A maximum penalty of 3years and a fine up to $250,000.

The Food and Drug Administration – Office of Criminal Investigation worked on the case. Assistant U.S. Attorney Kimberly Hare and John Claud, trial attorney with the Department of Justice’s Office of Consumer Litigation, are prosecuting.

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Re: Chula Vista duo indicted in fake Lyme disease cure

Postby rlstanley » Mon 8 Dec 2008 2:13

From LymeBlog:

Misinformation: Trio indicted in fake Lyme disease diagnosis, cure and marketing scheme


Misinformation: Trio indicted in fake Lyme disease diagnosis, cure and marketing scheme

LymeBlog News
Lexington, KY USA
By Mac McDonald, LymeBlog News Editor

A federal grand jury in Kansas has indicted three people suspected of selling bogus treatments for Lyme disease, along with a microscope they claimed would diagnose the disease.

Acting U.S. Attorney Marietta Parker said that the three are charged with creating a fraudulent marketing scheme to sell medical equipment and drug treatments for a nonexistent epidemic of Lyme disease.

The indictment names a former Kansas medical doctor, who lost his license and is serving a 32 month sentence for manslaughter in connection with the death of one of his patients due to administering one of these drugs for the treatment for Lyme disease.

The 25-count indictment charged John R. Toth, 59, of Topeka, KA, Robert W. Bradford, 77, and Brigitte G. Byrd, 63, of Chula Vista, CA with conspiracy, mail fraud, introducing a misbranded medical device, and distributing unapproved and misbranded drugs.

Bradford is the founder of CRB, Inc., based in Chula Vista, and American Biologics, a company which markets supplements, symposiums and the Bradford Microscope. According to the American Biologics website Bradford claims to be a doctor although he is not a physician and has no science degree from an accredited university, according to the indictment. The website further states that the Bradford Variable Projection Microscope "... is a hightly (sic) effective assessment tool enabling practitioners to perform functional assessments of their patients' health status."

Bradford claimed to have invented the Lyme disease detecting microscope and conducted human intravenous drug experiments at a hospital in Tijuana that treated Lyme disease. According to the indictment he claimed that the microscope could be used to identify Lyme disease. The American Biologics website mentions that the microscope can be used with something called Dark field mode. "Dark field" Microscopy and the Bradford Microscope are methods sometimes quoted by Lyme disease sufferers as the proof of diagnosis used by their alternative medicine practitioners.

In 2006 the Health Canada warned consumers about the three products manufactured by American Biologics, Bismacine (also known as Chromacine), Dioxychlor (also known as DC-3) and Sulfoxime and said that the same manufacturer markets a device called the Bradford High Resolution Microscope as a tool to diagnose Lyme disease.

To illustrate how well the marketing scheme was working, in 2006, the "Townsend Letter for Doctors & Patients", an online newsletter which claims to be "The Examiner of Alternative Medicine" and specializes in recommending the use of alternative medical treatments to Lyme disease sufferers, supported the device and treatment stating that the Bradford Variable Projection Microscope (BVPM) showed "images of Lyme spirochete and cyst forms." and Dr. Robert Bradford, was "... the developer of Bismacine,TM a chemical compound of bismuth. This formulation has shown to be effective at the Ingles Hospital against the spirochete and cyst forms of the Lyme organism." The newsletter's website still includes writings by "Professor Robert W. Bradford and Henry W. Allen".

Further examples of the effectiveness of the marketing plan appear as recently as three weeks ago, in 2008, where, Brian Rosner, owner of BioMed Publishing Group, publisher of books on Lyme Disease treatment, published Bradford's complete protocol for Lyme disease treatment on his lymebook.com blog (November 15, 2008). In his blog he calls Bradford "... Dr. Bradford, a well respected Lyme doctor". Rosner is also the author of such books as "When Antibiotics Fail: Lyme Disease And Rife Machines, With Critical Evaluation Of Leading Alternative Therapies" and "The Top 10 Lyme Disease Treatments: Defeat Lyme Disease With The Best Of Conventional And Alternative Medicine"

The indictment from the Kansas grand jury states that Bradford, Byrd and C.R.B. executed a marketing plan aimed at creating demand for Bradford’s microscope and certain drugs they sold for the treatment of Lyme disease. The Townsend Letter, Rosner and other supposed Lyme disease advise experts and publishers who have recommended the device or the treatment were not mentioned in this indictment. It is also unclear when, or even if, charges will be filed against other medical and alternative practitioners in the United States who use the Bradford microscope to convince their patients that they have Lyme disease or recommend the treatment developed by Bradford.

U.S. Attorney Parker stated that, in fact, there was no epidemic of Lyme disease, the microscope could not diagnose Lyme disease and the drugs the defendants were selling could not cure Lyme disease.

The pair from Chula Vista are accused of making more than $400,000 from the alleged conspiracy between April 2004 and August 2006, mostly through CRB Inc. according to the indictment.

In Kansas, the doctor, John R. Toth, used Bradford's microscope and Bradford's treatments. He charged patients about $100 for each use of the microscope that supposedly diagnosed Lyme disease and approximately $320 for a series of injections he called antimicrobial treatment, according to the indictment.


News Sources:

Indictment says Lyme disease treatment a fraud
The Capitol-Journal, Topeka, KA USA

Chula Vista duo indicted in fake Lyme disease cure
The Union-Tribune, San Diego, CA USA



Recent information from Forsgren: Sunday, November 2, 2008, Dr. Robert Bradford D.Sc., N.M.D.

Snippets:

A bit of good luck came my way today while at Medicine Week in Baden-Baden. Dr. Robert Bradford, the inventor of the Bradford microscope, was there. He did a handful of evaluations today using his microscope to show doctors the power of what he had created. I was fortunate to have been one of the people he did a session with.

SNIP

He found a macrophage and eosinophil both whith a captured Lyme cyst. I wondered if the photon therapy was already waking up my immune response to Borrelia as all evidence of it that we saw in the blood was captured by a white blood cell. We did see one spirochete in a B-cell as well.

After the 45 minutes we spent together (and with anyone walking by at the exhibition), he made some observations and recommendations. It was actually funny that when he said he saw Lyme disease (which he did know in advance), the people standing by seemed shocked. Almost like they could not believe I had such a "rare" disease. I could only suggest they have their blood done next


SNIP
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Re: Chula Vista duo indicted in fake Lyme disease cure

Postby Claudia » Mon 8 Dec 2008 16:15

Just another day in LymeLand: self-deceit, enabling, stupidity, fleecing and greed.

The interconnected, incestuous, self-appointed mouth pieces have so much to work with, and so few obstacles in their way, it's just one big field of opportunity for them.

Somebody posted the newspaper article on LNusa asking "Topic: Has anybody fallen for this? ": http://flash.lymenet.org/scripts/ultima ... 1;t=075062

Note SForsgren's reply:

SForsgren
Frequent Contributor
Member # 7686

posted 05 December, 2008 06:24 PM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
He has an amazing microscope and ability to determine what health issues are a problem based on what he sees in the blood. I don't know about credentials, etc. but Bradford is not all bad based on what I have seen and heard.

--------------------
In Better Health,
Scott (aka "The Better Health Guy")
"Public Health Alert" Contributor


On the biggest Lyme forum in the US, only one member made any attempt to call Forsgren on his defense/endorsement of Bradford. Very sad.

Also note on this LNusa thread a member's posting of The Townsend Letter content to support and validate Bradford.

:bonk: :bonk: :bonk: :bonk: :bonk:
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Re: Chula Vista duo indicted in fake Lyme disease cure

Postby rlstanley » Mon 8 Dec 2008 18:08

The Townsend article by 'professor' Bradford is recommended reading at the Lyme Induced Autism Foundation (LIA). This article is the one that recommends the use of a bismuth compound, Bismacine, which has been found to be responsible for patient deaths ; thread here: viewtopic.php?f=12&t=957

The link to the article on the LIA site can be found by clicking on the left-hand button: Lyme information/research

Scroll down to "Helpful Lyme Research", and you'll see:
Biochemistry of Lyme Disease - Spirochete / Cyste http://www.townsendletter.com/FebMar2006/lyme0206.htm

.
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Re: Chula Vista duo indicted in fake Lyme disease cure

Postby minitails2 » Tue 9 Dec 2008 11:13

Great info guys. Thanks to all, especially Cavey for bringing it up. It's certainly good to hear. :woohoo:
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Re: Chula Vista duo indicted in fake Lyme disease cure

Postby rlstanley » Thu 11 Dec 2008 5:51

from Lymeblog article above:

Brian Rosner, owner of BioMed Publishing Group, publisher of books on Lyme Disease treatment, published Bradford's complete protocol for Lyme disease treatment on his lymebook.com blog (November 15, 2008). In his blog he calls Bradford "... Dr. Bradford, a well respected Lyme doctor".


From Some notes on Robert W. Bradford...

Bradford is said to have received two honorary degrees: a "cultural doctorate in nutritional science" in 1983 from the World University and a "doctor of biochemistry degree" in 1984 from Medicina Alternativa, an "international holistic medical group" in Sri Lanka.

Although these degrees have no academic standing, he generally identifies himself as "Dr. Bradford" or "Robert Bradford, DSc."

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Re: Chula Vista duo indicted in fake Lyme disease cure

Postby Claudia » Thu 11 Dec 2008 15:31

According to Rosner:

Dr. Bradford, a well respected Lyme doctor.


How unbelievably misleading to try and pass this guy off as a respected medical doctor to Lyme patients.

And Rosner on Rosner:

Bryan Rosner is an internationally recognized author, educator and speaker. His articles and books on Lyme Disease have received critical acclaim from patients and physicians in more than 15 countries. Bryan’s first book, Lyme Disease and Rife Machines, has earned bestselling status in the United States, Europe, and elsewhere in the world. Bryan's research is frequently referenced by patients and doctors alike.

http://www.lymebook.com/top10abouttheauthor


I second Rita's comment on another thread concerning that: HOGWASH

Then you have Forsgren writing:

"Dr. Bradford consults with a clinic in Mexico. He commented that he has a 3-week protocol for Lyme that is in-patient and runs $15K for the entire program. He said his success rate with Lyme is over 90%. I have not known anyone personally that has tried it, but he seemed confident. He was previously interested in cancer and then turned to Lyme after he contracted it himself around 2002."

http://betterhealthguy.blogspot.com/200 ... dford.html


According to The Pubic Health Alert, Forsgren is:

one of the most respected voices in the Lyme disease community


Now, any place else that would be just plain funny.

But all these attempts by the same intertwined people to continually make silk purses out of sow's ears is, for the most part, accepted at face value by the gullible and uninitiated in LymeLand.

It's certainly one big clusterbunk, and another example of the uncredentialed, self-appointed gurus/"experts" bolstering and validating each other in LymeLand.
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Re: Chula Vista duo indicted in fake Lyme disease cure

Postby LymeEnigma » Thu 11 Dec 2008 20:20

What the heck does it take to convince the mainstream Lymie that not all that glitters is gold? I cannot believe the following people like this continue to enjoy, even after their sheep skins have been ripped away!
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