Lyme and hormones

Medical topics with questions, information and discussion related to Lyme disease and other tick-borne diseases.
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Yvonne
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Lyme and hormones

Postby Yvonne » Fri 9 Nov 2007 9:45

The endocrine glands produce hormones. For example, the pituitary gland in the brain produces several different hormones including growth hormone, and the adrenal glands located on top of the kidneys produce seven major hormones.

Borreliosis patients usually have multiple endocrine hormone deficiencies. This is based upon results in about 800 panels of test results. At my office we use a twenty-four hour urine collection method that tests men for nineteen different hormones and women for twenty-one different hormones.

Hormones that are bound to proteins (such as proteins in the blood) are not active, and are therefore ineffective. It is the unbound hormones that are free to do their work in the body. The kidneys filter and retain most proteins so that they stay in the blood. Thus inactive hormones that are bound to proteins also tend to stay in the blood. Hormones that are unbound pass more freely through the kidneys’ filtering system and show up in the urine. Since hormones in the urine tend to be unbound, active and working, this may better reflect true endocrine functional status {as opposed to other types of testing}.

For example, a free testosterone level in the blood is thought to be a better test by some doctors, as opposed to a total testosterone level which measures protein-bound and unbound testosterone. A normal total hormone level in the blood does not always indicate what is really happening, if too much of the hormone is bound to proteins and not functioning actively enough to exert its full endocrine influence on the tissues of the body.

Hormone levels in blood and saliva can fluctuate significantly during the day. If you draw a blood or saliva specimen, it only tells you what the hormone levels are at that precise moment in time. However, a twenty-four hour urine specimen indicates how much hormone production is actually occurring throughout the day. This broader time frame of hormone production and collection should therefore give a truer picture of endocrine hormone status.

In short, twenty-four hour urine hormone testing has, in my opinion, three distinct advantages over blood and saliva testing. It more accurately reflects daily total hormone production, it measures free active working hormones, and it tests for 19 or 21 different hormones. All together it gives more of a “big picture” of the endocrine system for a lot less money.

Treatment of those hormones that are found to be below the normal range is straightforward. In general, it is more ideal to have hormones in the upper half of the normal ranges, not just in the normal range. The laboratory I use has tested normal healthy people. Their normal ranges are matched by sex and age. Borreliosis patients that are chronically sick may respond better to the influences of hormones on their tissues if the hormone levels are in the upper half of the normal range. Healthy people may do fine in the lower half of the normal range, but those who are sick may often need extra help with hormone supplementation.

The proof is in the pudding, as they say. I have found that borreliosis patients respond dramatically to hormone supplementation. A typical borreliosis patient needs about three to six different hormones. Most of these hormones are prescribed and are either natural or identical (bioidentical) to hormones produced in the body, as opposed to over-the-counter or synthetic drugs.

Symptoms and diseases caused by endocrine hormone deficiencies are similar to those caused by tick-borne infections and hypercoagulation. The three treatments with the most dramatic results in borreliosis patients are antibiotics, heparin and hormones, and patients seem to do better when all three treatments are done. A three-stranded cord is not easily broken.
http://www.drcharlescrist.com/hormones.htm
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Yvonne
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Re: Lyme and hormones

Postby Yvonne » Fri 9 Nov 2007 9:45

Adolescent hormonal surges and the emotional turmoil wrought by LD at once camouflage and exacerbate each other mutually. Thus, children tend to be unruly, hard to please and prone to atypical emotional reactions. A child who is misbehaving in class should not be dismissed as a "bad kid". Lyme can catalyze inappropriate behavior and commentary. Many patients retrospectively realize that they were out of control but in the event were unable to intercept their behavior. Misattribution as to the origin of behavioral perturbations is the rule. The development of aberrant personality traits can be gradual or even situational, further obscuring the medical etiology. An acute break from normal behavior can serve to highlight the abnormalities and suggest the need for evaluation. thus, dysfunctional behavior and intellectual incapacitation are bitterly recalled by LD patients when they finally realize how their interpersonal relationships, school and vocational conduct were negatively impacted.

Impaired fertility and a loss of libido is not infrequent in LD. A reversible cause of infertility should be sought and ought to include LD. Reduced sexual interest without an ostensible justification is usually misinterpreted by the partner with predictable social and psychological turmoil. LD infection in the CNS or in the sex glands may be causal. In a few female LD patients, disturbed estrogen and progesterone levels were found. Early "menopause", skipped menses, and heavy menstrual flow represent a few of the perturbations in LD.

Women with symptomatic LD can experience new onset or heightened PMS (ballistic mood swings and irritability), or perimenstrual headache or cramps. The last of these theoretically could also be due to Pelvic LD infection (ooperitis or salpingitis) and/or elevated PGE-2 (prostaglandin E-2) levels, the latter having been reported in LD. A surfeit of PGE-2, free radicals, altered fat metabolism and general immunosuppression by LD may contribute to a predilection (stimulate or predispose) for oncogenesis (forming cancer). Carcinomas are not unknown in LD: melanoma, thyroid cancer, and lymphoma have been published. Free radicals, by engendering connective tissue cross-linking, could be responsible for intra-abdominal adhesions to form, and for some LD patients to appear older than their stated age, or have a haggard facial appearance.

Breast pain due to mastitis and testicular pain from orchitis have been described by some of my patients. So far, there are 3 men in our files whose chief complaint with LD was pelvic pain due to chronic prostatitis. The therapeutic strategems for LD provided superior relief whereas using Cipro or Doxycycline alone gave partial or temporary improvement

http://www.ariplex.com/lyme/lymbleie.htm
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Yvonne
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Re: Lyme and hormones

Postby Yvonne » Fri 9 Nov 2007 9:46

Pituitary and other endocrine abnormalities are far more common than generally realized. Evaluate fully,
including growth hormone levels. Quite often, a full battery of provocative tests is in order to fully define the
problem. When testing the thyroid, measure free T3 and free T4 levels and TSH, and nuclear scanning and
testing for autoantibodies may be necessary.

Activation of the inflammatory cascade has been implicated in blockade of cellular hormone receptors. One
example of this is insulin resistance; clinical hypothyroidism can result from receptor blockade and thus
hypothyroidism can exist despite normal serum hormone levels. These may partly account for the
dyslipidemia and weight gain that is noted in 80% of chronic Lyme patients. In addition to measuring free T3
and T4 levels, check basal A.M. body temperatures. If hypothyroidism is found, you may need to treat with
both T3 and T4 preparations until blood levels of both are normalized. To ensure sustained levels, when T3 is
prescribed, have it compounded in a time-release form.

http://www.ilads.org/files/burrascano_0905.pdf
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Yvonne
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Re: Lyme and hormones

Postby Yvonne » Fri 9 Nov 2007 9:47

Human thyroid autoantigens and proteins of Yersinia and Borrelia share amino acid sequence homology that includes binding motifs to HLA-DR molecules and T-cell receptor.

Benvenga S, Santarpia L, Trimarchi F, Guarneri F.

Sezione di Endocrinologia del Dipartimento Clinico Sperimentale di Medicina e Farmacologia, Universita di Messina, Messina, Italy. s.benvenga@me.nettuno.it

We previously reported that the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi could trigger autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD). Subsequently, we showed local amino acid sequence homology between all human thyroid autoantigens (human thyrotropin receptor [hTSH-R], human thyroglobulin [hTg], human thyroperoxidase [hTPO], human sodium iodide symporter [hNIS]) and Borrelia proteins (n = 6,606), and between hTSH-R and Yersinia enterocolitica (n = 1,153). We have now updated our search of homology with Borrelia (n = 11,198 proteins) and extended our search on Yersinia to the entire species (n = 40,964 proteins). We also searched the homologous human and microbial sequences for peptide-binding motifs of HLA-DR molecules, because a number of these class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules (DR3, DR4, DR5, DR8, and DR9) are associated with AITD. Significant homologies were found for only 16 Borrelia proteins (5 with hTSH-R, 2 with hTg, 3 with hTPO, and 6 with hNIS) and only 19 Yersinia proteins (4 with hTSH-R, 2 with hTg, 2 with hTPO, and 11 with hNIS). Noteworthy, segments of thyroid autoantigens homologous to these microbial proteins are known to be autoantigenic. Also, the hTSH-R homologous region of one Borrelia protein (OspA) contains an immunodominant epitope that others have found to be homologous to hLFA-1. This is of interest, as the hLFA-1/ICAM-1 ligand/receptor pair is aberrantly expressed in the follicular cells of thyroids affected by Hashimoto's thyroiditis. A computer-assisted search detected antigenic peptide binding motifs to the DR molecules implicated in AITD. In conclusion, our in silico data do not directly demonstrate that Borrelia and Yersinia proteins trigger AITD but suggest that a restricted number of them might have the potential to, at least in persons with certain HLA-DR alleles.

PMID: 16571084
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Yvonne
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Re: Lyme and hormones

Postby Yvonne » Fri 9 Nov 2007 9:48

LYME DISEASE and it’s connection to THYROID/ADRENAL PROBLEMS

John D. Bleiweiss, M.D., a Lyme Disease specialist, states, “Increasingly, I am encountering thyroid disease in LD. A local endocrinologist has remarked to me privately that the incidence of thyroid involvement in LD may be greater than expected from the normal population.” He goes on to say, “In many of these patients, the thyroid dysfunction was seen to originate in the pituitary or hypothalmus. Remaining alert to the possibility of thyroid disease is essential because there can be considerable clinical overlap with LD. Subacute thyroiditis is the most prevalent thyroid phenomenon I see in LD. Hypoadrenalism can uncommonly develop: http://www.lymenet.de/lymcheck.html#essay


Dr. James Howenstine, a Lyme Disease expert, states, “Profound dysfunction of the hypothalamus, pituitary, adrenal, thyroid glands and gonads is very common in mycoplasmal, fungal, and anerobic bacterial infections. http://www.rumormillnews.com/cgi-bin/ar ... read=51356 He goes on to say, “There is considerable evidence that many patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Fibromyalgia, and Lyme disease have an infectious disease. Lyme disease needs to be considered in every patient with a chronic illness.”

http://www.stopthethyroidmadness.com/lyme-disease/
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kelmo
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Re: Lyme and hormones

Postby kelmo » Fri 9 Nov 2007 15:51

Yvonne---EXCELLENT information.

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LymeEnigma
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Re: Lyme and hormones

Postby LymeEnigma » Fri 9 Nov 2007 18:38

I am currently sitting here, trying to handle the information overload ... Yvonne, you are quite the powerhouse! ;)

I have been trying to connect the dots on the hormone connection for a while now, and it's definitely a bit complicated for someone with my limited biology background; I can only wrap my mind around so much in one sitting, especially at this time of the month. Still, I know for a fact that the Lyme is directly or indirectly responsible for my hot flashes, unusual cycles, long menses, hellish PMS, and monthly "marathon headaches." I have read a good deal of text explaining that many Lyme-related problems can be traced all the way back to the pituitary ... which can also be substantiated by the gross numbers of Lyme sufferers who experience chronic insomnia.

I'm wondering if determining the actual mechanism to these hormonal problems might be more effective than simply supplementing the low hormones ... for example, if the gland malfunctions can be connected directly to active infection or autoimmune activity, doctors might find ways to treat the cause rather than the symptoms. Perhaps that is easier said than done....

Nick
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Re: Lyme and hormones

Postby Nick » Fri 9 Nov 2007 21:09

Yvonne wrote:In conclusion, our in silico data do not directly demonstrate that Borrelia and Yersinia proteins trigger AITD but suggest that a restricted number of them might have the potential to, at least in persons with certain HLA-DR alleles.

the problem with this homology search is that most of these borrelia proteins are probably not expressed in the host in significant numbers and certainly not on the outside where they can interact with the immune system and cause auto-immune disorders. Even if internal proteins are expressed in the host, they would only interact with the host immune system when the Bb organism dies. The only outer protein that is mentioned is OSPA which normally should not be present in humans (or only in low qty) because OSPA is involved in colonization of the tick gut.

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Yvonne
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Re: Lyme and hormones

Postby Yvonne » Sat 10 Nov 2007 10:55

LymeEnigma wrote:

am currently sitting here, trying to handle the information overload ... Yvonne, you are quite the powerhouse!]


Image

That wasn't so difficult,I only have to copy it from The Dutch lyme forum Image
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LymeEnigma
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Re: Lyme and hormones

Postby LymeEnigma » Sat 10 Nov 2007 18:24

I'm still impressed. ;)


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