Dr. Bela P. Bozsik (Hungary)

For everything that is related to Lyme and/or Lymeland, but doesn't fit in the other forums. Speak your mind, connect, ask help, etc.
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Dr. Bela P. Bozsik (Hungary)

Post by X-member » Thu 26 Jan 2012 15:10

From the Norwegian Lyme Association, an interview:

"25 years of experience with Lyme Borreliosis"

http://www.lyme.no/25-years-of-experien ... orreliosis

A quote (but it is more to read on the link):
The question regarding treatment is still a matter of debate, as we all know. Health authorities in almost every country suggest treatment according to guidelines from IDSA in the USA. This happens even though it is clear that the situation is very differing in Europe and USA. In Europe we have at least three substrains, perhaps five or more, of Borrelia that cause human illness. In the USA there is one strain that is dominating. Standard treatment for borreliosis in most countries is 2-4 weeks of monotherapy with ceftriaxone, doxycyklin, or eventually Penicillin V in early stages.

Dr. Bozsik, You have been a pioneer in the development of combined antibiotic therapy for Lyme borreliosis, can you say something about the background for this work? It was obvious that monotherapy in many cases did not give a satisfactory result, and I started to think that the combination of different antibiotics could give a synergistic effect. With the help of colleagues in different Institutes I did some studies In vitro, with different strains of Borrelia in culture. We tested fluoroquinolone in combination with different other antibiotics like doxycyclin, clarithromycin etc. In all cases we saw a marked synergy, even though Dr. Wilske had presented In vitro-results at the Stockholm conference showing that ciprofloxacin was ineffective alone against Borrelia. We also saw that some patients had good effect of their treatment while others did not improve much. Professor Neubert presented results from In-vitro tests, showing that different Borrelia strains had different susceptibility to different types of antibiotics. Some time later, at the conference in Vienna in 2005, it was discussed with Brorson if tinidazole could be an efficient drug to include in the treatment regime, to target the Gemma (spheroplast, “cyst”-like stage).

The principle for the development of my treatment schedule has been to use ciprofloxacin in combination with another antibiotic to utilize the synergistic effect that was demonstrated in the laboratory studies, and in addition to include tinidazole for the Gemma. In our practice we saw that the patients had cyclic variation in their symptoms in periods of 3-4 weeks. The treatment period should last for 2-3 times the duration of the individual cycle for the patient; that is approximately 8 weeks. We experienced that clinical improvement could continue for a long time after ending the treatment, 2-4 moths even 6 monthes after. However, if the symptoms continue or flare up, the patient may need repeated treatment with a different antibiotic. It is important to know what strain of Borrelia the patient is infected with, in order to choose the best antibiotic for the treatment schedule

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Re: Dr. Bela P. Bozsik (Hungary)

Post by X-member » Thu 26 Jan 2012 15:14

From another topic in this forum:

"Positive predictive value of B. burgdorferi serology"

http://www.lymeneteurope.org/forum/view ... zik#p21771
There are estimates stating that more than one of every ten people is infected by Borrelia burgdorferi in the EU and the USA.
Edit to add:

The link to the video:

"Dr Bozsik - Dark Field Microscopy DualDur (microscopie pe camp intunecat) - Borrelia Burgdorferi"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AiwRTu9zg5k
Last edited by X-member on Thu 26 Jan 2012 23:29, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Dr. Bela P. Bozsik (Hungary)

Post by Martian » Thu 26 Jan 2012 15:30

Carina wrote:From another topic in this forum:

"Positive predictive value of B. burgdorferi serology"

http://www.lymeneteurope.org/forum/view ... zik#p21771
There are estimates stating that more than one of every ten people is infected by Borrelia burgdorferi in the EU and the USA.
Where are those estimates published? Whose estimates are they? What are they based upon?

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Re: Dr. Bela P. Bozsik (Hungary)

Post by X-member » Thu 26 Jan 2012 15:37

I don't know, Martian!

It is a qoute from the video, if I remember correct.

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Re: Dr. Bela P. Bozsik (Hungary)

Post by Martian » Thu 26 Jan 2012 15:53

Without such data it's useless, unreliable, because it could as well be yet another unsubstantiated claim.

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Re: Dr. Bela P. Bozsik (Hungary)

Post by X-member » Thu 26 Jan 2012 16:05

Martian, you wrote:
Without such data it's useless, unreliable, because it could as well be yet another unsubstantiated claim.
I don't know if it is this he talk about:

From The Lancet:

http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lance ... 5/fulltext

TinyUrl:

http://tinyurl.com/7pda52m

The Lancet, Volume 363, Issue 9412, Page 901, 13 March 2004 Article>doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(04)15756-5Cite or Link Using DOI

Prevalence of Lyme borreliosis

Bela P Bozsik

Sir—In their Seminar on Lyme borreliosis (Nov 15, p 1639),1 Gerold Stanek and Franc Strle mention little about prevalence. This aspect of the disease has also been neglected in other recent papers.2
Lyme borreliosis has a high incidence throughout the Northern hemisphere. One of the reasons for this high rate is its chronic nature: patients with specific and non-specific symptoms or rare syndromes3 can remain undiagnosed for years or even decades. Treatment with antibiotics does not always result in eradication of the organism, therefore without follow-up and repeated treatment at recurrence, Lyme borreliosis chronica can develop.4, 5
Lyme borreliosis is often undetectable by serological techniques. In our practice, the passive haemag glutination method (Diagast, France) failed to detect more than 60% of cases, compared with the newer ELISA (Enzygnost, Behring, Germany). The primary and secondary errors of this passive haemagglutination method were calculated as 1·9% and 6·3%, respectively, from 50000 investigations. The significant difference between these diagnostic techniques highlights the need to assess other factors, especially clinical symptoms, in the evaluation of results and formulation of the definitive diagnosis.
The occurrence of Lyme borreliosis can be estimated from the reported incidence of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) and the bacterial (1:10) and viral (1:1000) infectivity rate of ticks (http://www.tbe-info.com). The estimated incidence of TBE in Hungary (population 10 million) is 200—400 cases per year, and the infectivity rate of ticks is 100 times higher for Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato than for the TBE virus. Thus there could be more than 20000 new cases of Lyme borreliosis per year in Hungary. Given the subclinical nature of the disease, the problems with diagnosis, misunderstanding about criteria and diagnosis, and the mean age of patients being 60 years, the number of patients affected at any one time could be as much as 1million—ie, 10% of the population.

References
1 Stanek G, Strle F. Lyme borreliosis. Lancet 2003; 362: 1639-1647. Summary | Full Text | PDF(1582KB) | CrossRef | PubMed
2 Steere AC. Lyme disease. N Engl J Med 2001; 345: 115-125. CrossRef | PubMed
3 Kristof V, Bozsik BP, Szirtes M, Simonyi J. Lyme borreliosis and Raynaud's syndrome. Lancet 1990; 335: 975-976. CrossRef | PubMed
4 Rowe PM. Chronic Lyme disease: the debate goes on. Lancet 2000; 355: 1436. Full Text | PDF(52KB) | CrossRef | PubMed
5 Chow CC, Evans AS, Noonan-Toly CM, et al. LD trends—Dutchess County, New York, 1992-2000. Mt Sinai J Med 2003; 70: 207-213. PubMed
Last edited by X-member on Thu 26 Jan 2012 23:30, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: Dr. Bela P. Bozsik (Hungary)

Post by X-member » Thu 26 Jan 2012 16:51

Maybe people sometimes misunderstand info like this?

He don't say (if I understand it right) that 10% of the population need treatment.

And it is not easy (I think) to estimate how many people it is that sometime in their life are infected with borrelia, and how many it is that don't notice it, or only have mild symptoms, or have symptoms that are not recognized and diagnosed as borrelia.

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Re: Dr. Bela P. Bozsik (Hungary)

Post by X-member » Sat 28 Jan 2012 20:57

"Video-microscopy and pictures of Borrelia burgdorferi and other spirochete like structures links collection"

By Marie Kroun, MD, Denmark


http://lymerick.net/videomicroscopy.htm

Quote (from the link above):
Dr. Bozsik found – data extracted from his Diagnosis lecture– that:

1. Spirochetes could be demonstrated in BLOOD by dark-field microscopy during all ACTIVE stages of pathogenesis!

2. 107 of 143 (75%) of the cases with live (moving) spirochetes found in their blood by dark-field microscopy, were confirmed by real-time PCR to belong to Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato:
66 (61.7%) B. burgdorferi sensu strictu
20 (18.7%) B. garinii
6 ( 5.6%) B. afzelii and
15 (14.0%) other Borreliae strains than the usual EUROPEAN strains

Many of these cases were also confirmed by monoclonal antibody stain for Borrelia burgdorferi with anti-ospA and anti-flagellin kindly donated by prof. Barbour USA.

3. One third (1/3) of these patients with proven LATE Lyme borreliosis were SERONEGATIVE!

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Re: Dr. Bela P. Bozsik (Hungary)

Post by X-member » Sat 28 Jan 2012 21:11

You can find a video by Dr Bozsik here, too:

Daninfekt, Denmark

http://daninfekt.dk/news.php

Click on the link below the "TV".

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Re: Dr. Bela P. Bozsik (Hungary)

Post by X-member » Mon 30 Jan 2012 12:52

I wrote earlier:
And it is not easy (I think) to estimate how many people it is that sometime in their life are infected with borrelia, and how many it is that don't notice it, or only have mild symptoms, or have symptoms that are not recognized and diagnosed as borrelia.
They are going to try to find out how it is in Sweden:

http://www.fou.nu/is/sverige/document/93921

"Asymptomatic borreliosis and the immune system"

A google translated quote:
Purpose:

To explore the immune response in individuals who have had Lyme disease without symptoms, and compare with people who have Lyme disease with symptoms and healthy controls.

Issues:

1. How common is Lyme disease without any symptoms?

2. What is the age and gender distribution as well as Lyme disease antibody pattern on those who have had Lyme disease without any symptoms?

3. Are there differences in immune response among persons with a history of Lyme disease with and without symptoms?
One more quote:
Application of the results - time dimension (the project manager's assessment)
The results are likely to apply within 5 years from project final.

Application of the results - impact (project manager's assessment)
International (in several countries)

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