Lyme Disease and the digestive tract

Topics with information and discussion about published studies related to Lyme disease and other tick-borne diseases.
cave76
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Re: Lyme Disease and the digestive tract

Post by cave76 » Mon 12 Nov 2007 17:03

Always, always have the simple blood test for H. pylori BEFORE any of the more invasive tests or treatments for GI tract malfunctions.

It may be just that, easily found and easily treated.

Then go on to other tests and treatments. :)

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LymeEnigma
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Re: Lyme Disease and the digestive tract

Post by LymeEnigma » Mon 12 Nov 2007 19:30

Good advice, Cave.

While a number of the studies note the various GI manifestations experienced by Lyme patients, I have to wonder how many of those manifestations might be the result of various undiagnosed co-infections. I have treated for both Lyme and babesia, and also taken a couple of antibiotics that could easily have treated HGE and bartonella; it seems to me that the cyclic vomiting issues I had resolved before I retreated for Lyme, and my gross anorexia definitely resolved after treating the babesia.

I just want to offer some advice for anyone who continues to suffer from cyclic vomiting and slow gut:

A gentle 20-30 minute massage to the stomach/abdomen sometimes can get the system moving, as well as any kind of light exercise, if you're able.

If you're already vomiting, I've found that a mixture of Gatorade and real ginger ale (also mix with water at first, if the taste buds are out of whack) drank slowly eventually helps settle the stomach and rehydrate the body.

Alternate this "rehydrating drink" with warm broth.

Sit in the shower (have a bucket handy on the side, and have a glass of rehydrating drink available). I don't know how this works, but it was always my best bet to getting the vomiting to stop. Sit with the shower head beating down at a sharp angle, and get the water as warm as you can take it. Close your eyes and let the water beat against your back. Take ONE SIP of the rehydrating drink every fifteen minutes. If you let your thirst get to you and down the glass, you'll end up vomiting again, so try not to do that, as tempting as that may be.

If someone is home to monitor you and you have a shower in your bath, plug up the tub and let your stomach go weightless in the water.

My heart goes out to anyone still suffering severe GI problems. I'm glad to "only" have IBS at this juncture. I also want to encourage anyone suffering from cyclic vomiting and/or slow gut to test for co-infections that might exist in their region.

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Yvonne
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Re: Lyme Disease and the digestive tract

Post by Yvonne » Tue 13 Nov 2007 11:03

cave76 wrote:Always, always have the simple blood test for H. pylori BEFORE any of the more invasive tests or treatments for GI tract malfunctions.

It may be just that, easily found and easily treated.

Then go on to other tests and treatments. :)
My daughter was diagnosed with H.pylori 4 years ago and treated with metronidazole but the
symtomps didn't disappear,they increased.

For mycoplasma she became erythromycin and for Lyme disease 8 months Doxy and 6 months
Clarithrymocin(and a few weeks hydroxychloroquine) but the GI manifestations are still there.
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Yvonne
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Re: Lyme Disease and the digestive tract

Post by Yvonne » Sun 16 Dec 2007 19:27

Constipation Heralding Neuroborreliosis

ABSTRACT

This is a report of 2 patients with Lyme disease who initially presented with severe constipation, which progressed to ascending muscular weakness resembling acute idiopathic polyneuritis, with neuropsychiatric symptoms, severe urinary retention, and hyponatremia. These symptoms resolved following proper antibiotic therapy.

COMMENT

Our 2 patients had documented Lyme disease manifesting initially with autonomic symptoms: severe constipation and urinary retention progressing to a syndrome similar to acute idiopathic polyneuritis, with hallucinations and hyponatremia. Both had a history of an atypical rash without central clearing. The presence of an atypical rash in patients with Lyme disease, however, has been described in as many as 50% of the cases.6

In the classic description of the clinical manifestations of Lyme disease, gastrointestinal tract symptoms, excluding constipation, were observed in 10% of patients.3 This is also the case with other spirochetal infections, in which constipation is not a characteristic symptom.7 Within days after starting antibiotic treatment, both patients’ constipation resolved. The pathophysiological features of the constipation in our patients are unclear, but rapid resolution with antibiotics strongly suggests that this symptom was directly produced by the infection.

Neuropsychiatric manifestations of acute neuroborreliosis, including hallucinations, psychoses, and encephalopathy, have been documented,8-9 but their cause is unclear. In case 1, there was no obvious underlying psychiatric history and other organic causes could not explain the hallucinations. They resolved with the start of antibiotic therapy and were thought to be at least temporally associated with the borreliosis. We are unable to explain the cause of the hallucinations, but speculate that neuroborreliosis could be the cause. Lyme psychosis has been reported mainly in Europe, where the genotype, B burgdorferi sensu stricto,10 is associated with Lyme disease. It is likely that this genotypic difference leads to varying phenotypic expressions of the disease.

It is hard to attribute the hallucinations simply to the hyponatremia, because only 0.5% of patients with hyponatremia exhibit hallucinations11 and usually at serum sodium levels below 120 mEq/L (an average of 115 mEq/L).12 Psychiatric manifestations of Lyme disease have been reported for many years. Although exact numbers are not available, depression is reported in 26% to 66% of patients with Lyme disease.13 Multiple neuropsychiatric symptoms have been linked to Lyme disease, including visual hallucinations.13

Urinary retention was once described as an initial presentation of Lyme disease.14 In that patient, serum Lyme titers were high, which likely resulted from tertiary Lyme disease with a history of untreated Bell palsy 5 years earlier. In our patients, the symptom was associated with acute neuroborreliosis, and improved following antibiotic treatment. The constipation and urinary retention may reflect involvement of the autonomic peripheral nervous system.

The hyponatremia exhibited by both patients was considered, following a complete endocrine examination, to be the result of the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone. To our knowledge, this has not been reported previously in a patient with Lyme disease, but inflammatory and infectious central nervous system processes have been associated with the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone, including acute idiopathic polyneuritis15 and meningitis.16 In the latter, fungal, bacterial, carcinomatous, and tuberculous infections have been implicated. In our patients, fluid restriction was instituted, with a good response.

http://archneur.ama-assn.org/cgi/conten ... type=HWCIT
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LymeEnigma
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Re: Lyme Disease and the digestive tract

Post by LymeEnigma » Sun 16 Dec 2007 20:50

It's unfortunate that antibiotics and hydroxycloroquine both can cause GI manifestations of their own ... I know that I had a heck of a time trying to discern what was my "IBS" and what was the medications, especially when I was on the zithro/plaqu combination. Interestingly, it was either Avelox or Cipro (short courses of each, used to combat a "chronic throat infection") that initially seemed to put my cyclic vomiting to a halt.

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Yvonne
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Re: Lyme Disease and the digestive tract

Post by Yvonne » Thu 17 Jan 2008 20:39

Am J Gastroenterol. 1998 Jul;93(7):1179-80.Links

Intestinal pseudoobstruction in acute Lyme disease: a case report

.Chatila R, Kapadia CR.
Department of Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8019, USA.

We report here a case of acute Lyme disease in a 61-yr-old man who developed a facial nerve paralysis and a relentless intestinal pseudoobstruction 2 wk after the initial prodrome. Both the facial nerve paralysis and pseudoobstruction persisted for a month until the patient sought medical attention. Both lesions resolved only after treatment for Lyme disease was initiated. The temporal association of the pseudoobstruction with the somatic cranial neuropathy and the response of both to specific therapy for Lyme disease suggest that the former was likely the result of a reversible autonomic neuropathy or dysfunction.

PMID: 9672362
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Yvonne
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Re: Lyme Disease and the digestive tract

Post by Yvonne » Fri 18 Jan 2008 9:56

Am J Kidney Dis. 2004 Mar;43(3):544-51. Links

MPGN secondary to Lyme disease.

Kirmizis D, Efstratiadis G, Economidou D, Diza-Mataftsi E, Leontsini M, Memmos D.
University Department of Nephrology, Hippokration General Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece. kirmizis@med.auth.gr

Lyme disease is a multisystem disorder with protean clinical manifestations that is caused by the tick-transmitted spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi. Infection caused by B burgdorferi is known to induce glomerulonephritis in animals. We report a patient with acute postinfection membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis after the clinical multisystem manifestation of Lyme disease, which was confirmed serologically. Although the patient was dialysis dependent for a protracted period of 5 months, the final outcome was excellent.

PMID: 14981613
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Yvonne
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Re: Lyme Disease and the digestive tract

Post by Yvonne » Tue 19 Feb 2008 21:06

Med Parazitol (Mosk). 2007 Oct-Dec;(4):12-6. Links

Biochemical parameters of hepatobiliary system functions in viral hepatitis or ixodes tick-borne borreliosis concurrent with chronic opisthorchiasis
[Article in Russian]


[No authors listed]
The biochemical parameters of hepatobiliary system functions were studied in patients with opisthorchiasis and concomitant diseases, such as chronic viral hepatitis concurrent with chronic opisthorchiasis, as well as Ixodes tick-borne borreliosis in the presence of the same invasion. Although the magnitude ofbiochemical changes is not great in chronic opisthorchiasis or chronic viral hepatitis, the concomitance of these two diseases were ascertained to result in pronounced abnormalities, by demonstrating the exhaustion of spare capacities of the hepatobiliary system in parasitic invasion (or viral infection). When opisthorchiasis was concurrent with Ixodes tickborne borreliosis, some parameters under study differed from those in the groups of patients with monoinfections. Variance analysis showed that chronic opisthorchiasis had a great impact on carbohydrate and lipid metabolisms (glucose and cholesterol levels). The findings suggest that the formation of stable host-parasite relationships in chronic opisthorchiasis alters human metabolic processes and their compensatory capabilities.

PMID: 18274146
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Yvonne
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Re: Lyme Disease and the digestive tract

Post by Yvonne » Tue 19 Feb 2008 21:16

World J Gastroenterol. 2007 Aug 21;13(31):4268-9. Links

Resolution of chronic hepatitis C following parasitosis.

Byrnes V, Chopra S, Koziel MJ.
Division of Gastroenterology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, USA.

An inefficient cellular immune response likely leads to chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Resolution of chronic HCV infection in the absence of treatment is a rare occurrence. We report the case of a 39-year old white male with a 17-year history of chronic HCV infection, who eradicated HCV following a serious illness due to co-infection with Babesia (babesiosis), Borriela Borgdorferi (Lyme disease) and Ehrlichia (human granulocytic ehrlichiosis). We hypothesize that the cellular immune response mounted by this patient in response to his infection with all three agents but in particular Babesia was sufficient to eradicate HCV.

PMID: 17696260
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Yvonne
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Re: Lyme Disease and the digestive tract

Post by Yvonne » Sun 20 Apr 2008 11:46

Ann Intern Med. 1988 May;108(5):707-8. Links

Hepatitis due to recurrent Lyme disease.

Goellner MH, Agger WA, Burgess JH, Duray PH.
Gundersen Clinic, La Crosse, Wisconsin.

PMID: 3358572


Dig Dis Sci. 2007 Oct;52(10):2629-32. Epub 2007 Jul 20. Links

Necrotizing granulomatous hepatitis as an unusual manifestation of Lyme disease.

Zanchi AC, Gingold AR, Theise ND, Min AD.
Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Pathology, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, New York 10013, USA.

PMID: 17638077


Presse Med. 2002 Feb 23;31(7):319. Links

Lyme borreliosis hepatitis
[Article in French]

Nicolas X, Granier H, Zagnoli F, Bellard S.
PMID: 11899689


Hepatology. 1989 Feb;9(2):335-6. Links

Relapsing or reinfectious lyme hepatitis.
Schoen RT.
Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06510.

PMID: 2912832


Gastroenterol Clin Biol. 2001 Dec;25(12):1125-6. Links
Hepatic injuries related to Lyme borreliosis: response to 2 cases presented by I. Dadamessi et al
[Article in French]


Dhote R, Sogni P, Assous MV.
PMID: 11911003


Pediatr Infect Dis J. 1990 Aug;9(8):592-3. Links

Lyme disease presenting as hepatitis and jaundice in a child.

Edwards KS, Kanengiser S, Li KI, Glassman M.
Department of Pediatrics, New York Medical College, Valhalla 10595.

PMID: 2235178


Lancet. 1987 Sep 12;2(8559):623-4. Links

Granulomatous hepatitis associated with Lyme disease.
Chavanet P, Pillon D, Lancon JP, Waldner-Combernoux A, Maringe E, Portier H.
PMID: 2887904

: J Am Board Fam Pract. 1992 Nov-Dec;5(6):635-7. Links

Hepatitis associated with Lyme disease.
Sinusas K, Kazakoff MA, Macchia C.
Family Practice Residency Program, Middlesex Hospital, Middletown, CT 06457.

PMID: 1462798

1: Med Clin (Barc). 1994 May 14;102(18):716-7. Links

Liver changes and positive serology against Borrelia burgdorferi
[Article in Spanish]


Saz JV, Nuncio S, Merino FJ, Aquise M.
PMID: 8028426

Wien Med Wochenschr. 1987 Aug 15;137(14-15):343-6. Links

Acute hepatitis in Lyme borreliosis
[Article in German]


Killmann H, Lind P, Stanek G.
Neurologisch-Psychiatrischen Abteilung, Krankenhauses der Barmherzigen Brüder Graz-Eggenberg.

The clinical feature of an acute hepatitis within a tick-borne meningopolyneuritis Garin-Bujadoux-Bannwarth is described by means of a given case and the etiological context is being discussed.

PMID: 3673099
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