CDC FAQ: Can Lyme disease be transmitted sexually?

Topics with information and discussion about published studies related to Lyme disease and other tick-borne diseases.
volumi
Posts: 28
Joined: Thu 30 Jan 2014 17:18

Re: CDC FAQ: Can Lyme disease be transmitted sexually?

Post by volumi » Sun 2 Feb 2014 19:23

I have never understood, and nobody could never explain to me, why 2 significants bands p30 and p34 were excluded in the CDC critieria for WB.
OspA and OspB are part of the vaccine. Yet, CDC criteria includes 41 kDa because that is what they found to be a useful and specific finding all across Lyme pts. Shares no homology, per Fikrig's et al patent findings and is not variable like the outer surface proteins. Incredibly useful band. Persing wanted a separate test to differentiate between vaccinated individuals and actual spirochete-infected individuals.

So, back to sexual transmission.

RobertF
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Joined: Wed 25 Jul 2007 23:29
Location: The Netherlands
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Re: CDC FAQ: Can Lyme disease be transmitted sexually?

Post by RobertF » Sun 2 Feb 2014 19:55

That's right, served for the vaccine, to be able to distinguish vaccinated from non-vaccinated patients, but it failed, so solely a business decision, the biggest crime in Lyme history
The amount of vaccinated people is negligible, so there is no need to exclude them

duncan
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Joined: Wed 5 Sep 2012 18:48

Re: CDC FAQ: Can Lyme disease be transmitted sexually?

Post by duncan » Sun 2 Feb 2014 20:42

There is always the possibility that even if they included the 30 and 34 bands, they could simply ratchet up the requirements to 7 of 12 bands. This is the kind of dangerously silly semantic games I fear.

Speaking of semantics, for those CDC sexual transmission studies cited, how did the respective researchers gauge "infected"? What was the metric? How did they define "infected"? Was the same definition deployed for each study cited? Were antibodies looked at? Was it whether Bb was cultivable???

The key to me is wording, which is why I was concerned about the ILADS sexual transmission study. Well, I feel the IDSA and CDC are also suspect players in this potential issue. There is the constant spectre hovering over studies new and old that certain key words are loaded, like dice. Loaded with difference meanings than a layperson may embrace, or a different scientific camp. "Infected" is one such word. "Recovery" is one, too. "Sero-positive" is still another. And lets not forget "secondary" symptoms, i.e. those not deemed serious, like pain and cognitive decline and persistent exhaustion - vs "major" symptoms like erythema migrans which is painless and typically resolves on its own with virtually no discomfort. Yet this is a MAJOR symptom. Not profound cognitive decline or excruciating arthralgias. Or other symptoms - some objectifiable! - that plague sufferers.

So when I see a study about sexual transmission being touted by the CDC or IDSA, I have to grab my dictionary, and then grab another, because I'm not quite sure which definitions I will be looking at, and which interpretation is required.

And I have to hope that a NEW study looking at the possibility of sexual transmission can be launched so we can watch the process as it unfolds - and ensure the language employed is transparent and agreed upon.

RobertF
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Re: CDC FAQ: Can Lyme disease be transmitted sexually?

Post by RobertF » Sun 2 Feb 2014 22:36

@duncan I think you are right, wording, definitions is/are important.

In Holland we requested that Lyme disease became a notifiable disease. I was rejected because to a notifiable disease belongs a case definition, and that was the problem. How do you define Lyme disease? It is difficult to avoid over-or underreporting . I would have suggested only seropositiv patients with 2 WB bands. May be you get a underreporting but at least you have data, although they are not completely correct but shows at least the size of the problem. Now we donot know at all and gues

I think you could start a study by examine sperm of Lyme patients and when they are sexual active to examine the spouse. I think that the spouse can be infected without developing Lyme disease, equal to persons who are bitten and donot develop the disease. So sympton doesnot mean anything but you could look for DNA in smears or for antibodies. You should follow up infected spouse for min. 10 years to see if they develop the disease later on.

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