Dr. Jones (Again)

General or non-medical topics with information and discussion related to Lyme disease and other tick-borne diseases.
LymeH
Posts: 290
Joined: Mon 1 Mar 2010 16:41

Dr. Jones (Again)

Post by LymeH » Wed 6 Apr 2011 4:15

http://www.yaledailynews.com/news/2011/ ... ren-saved/
By Tapley Stephenson

Contributing Reporter

Tuesday, April 5, 2011

On his 82nd birthday, Dr. Charles Ray Jones sat in his New Haven office at 111 Park St., surrounded by patient files and wearing a blue tracksuit.

Though it has been a long while since Jones could last run — in fact, he now uses a cane to get around — Jones finds himself in a number of races: a medical one with a debilitating disease, a legal one with the Connecticut Medical Board, and even an academic one with Yale.

Over the past four decades, Jones has treated roughly 10,000 children with severe chronic Lyme disease. Parents from all over the world bring their children to Jones, and many said they consider him their final hope. But despite his popularity with his patients, many in the medical field strongly disagree with his practices, which, they say, treat a form of Lyme disease that does not exist.

Most doctors believe that Lyme disease, a tick-borne illness, almost always presents with a rash, fever or arthritic pain. But Jones says that Lyme disease can have a much wider array of symptoms, such as mental impairment, that can last for years.

Jones has already been brought before the medical board twice, both times receiving fines of $10,000 for procedural violations, which he claims threatens his ability to practice. Jones claims the high fines he received were due to the controversial length of his treatments, rather than because they caused any harm to his patients through his violations. Jones has never been sued for medical malpractice.

“I’m not being disciplined, I’m being harassed,” Jones told the News.

Jones began treating the disease’s symptoms in the late 1960s, before it was officially recognized by most medical professionals. When Yale doctors, led by then-Yale professor Allen Steere, worked to find the source of the disease in 1975, Jones gave the research team evidence by detailing the experiences of his own patients, lending Yale’s academic doctors a clinician’s perspective.

But in the early 1980s, Jones and the Yale scientists split on the longevity of the disease and the academic race to define the disease began. While Jones said he believed that Lyme disease can become chronic if untreated, Steere and other doctors claimed that the disease could be cured with three to six weeks of antibiotics.

More recently, Jones has been in conflict with Dr. Eugene Shapiro, a pediatrician at the Yale School of Medicine, who said he believes there is not enough evidence to support Jones’ theory.

“There is no benefit [to Jones’ long-term treatment], and there are expenses to both the individual and to society,” Shapiro told the News. “As for chronic Lyme, there is no definition and I believe there is no such entity.”

The two have clashed publicly and Shapiro has testified against Jones in front of the Connecticut Medical Board. Neither Jones nor Shapiro would comment about the other personally.

Jones said that despite the criticism from the medical community, he still strongly believes in what he does.

“I became the evil one,” Jones said. “But my kids got better.”


THE PATIENTS

Jones’ patients and their families said their lives would not be the same without Jones’ long-term course of treatment. Many said they have seen their children misdiagnosed with arthritis, dyslexia, or even autism — a result, they said, of the medical community’s denial that chronic Lyme disease exists.

Jones said he recalls one child, Timmy, a 6-year-old who came into his office with his mother, unable to speak or comprehend others. Timmy had been diagnosed by previous doctors with autism, but his mother believed it could be Lyme disease. Jones agreed.

“I remember he was sitting in my lap. He couldn’t talk, but he made eye contact well, showing signs of intelligence,” Jones said. “I looked him in the eye, I touched his cheeks and said, ‘I hope that I have the key that can unlock your brain.’”

Timmy then wiggled out of Jones’ lap and ran around the office, Jones said. Following a positive test for Lyme disease, Jones began treatment.

After roughly five months of antibiotics — far more than the generally prescribed three to six weeks — Timmy saw Jones for a second time.

“He came back four or five months later,” Jones said. “He didn’t run in the door, he walked in the door. He put my hands on his cheeks, he looked me in the eye, and said, ‘Thank you for giving me the key to my brain.’”

The walls of Jones’ office are covered in pictures, cards, and paintings — small pieces of gratitude from his patients. One card has a familiar Y with a bulldog over it.

A current pre-med sophomore, who asked to remain anonymous because of the rift between Yale’s medical professors and Jones, credits her place at Yale in part to Jones. Lyme disease had affected her processing and auditory abilities, but after five years with Jones, she graduated valedictorian of her high school.

“I’m immensely grateful for Dr. Jones, and the role he’s had in my life,” she told the News. “But I do feel like I shouldn’t use my name because I’ve heard some of my professors speak against chronic Lyme and those who treat it.”

LEGAL TROUBLES

While it started in academia, the controversy surrounding Jones’ practice has spread into the legal system.

Jones has been disciplined twice for diagnosing a patient without examining him in person as well as for keeping faulty records. Both complaints were filed by fathers of Jones’ patients, who were in custody battles for their children, Jones’ attorney Elliot Pollack said. The fathers claimed that Jones’ treatment was supporting their ex-spouse’s Münchausen syndrome, a psychiatric disorder in which a patient feigns illness in order to receive treatment from doctors, Pollack said.

Jones claims that due to a six-month waiting list, he will prescribe a patient antibiotics after hearing their symptoms. As for his record keeping, Jones claims that his staff of three nurses can only do so much in such a busy office.

But Shapiro said it is very dangerous to treat a patient without proper evaluation, especially over a long period of time with drugs that have significant side effects.

In addition to the fines he has received, Jones has to pay for a special investigator to review his files once a month for four years. Jones estimates this will cost him $2,000 to $10,000 per month.

“It makes you wonder, ‘When’s the last time this Board disciplined someone for successful patient outcomes?’” Pollack said.

Jones claims that he received such harsh punishment because his treatment contradicts the views of many in the medical community, originated by Steere and continued by others like Shapiro.

The legal race continues, but it may be the race against time that is most dire.

“I’m 82. They’re looking for bankruptcy or death or both,” Jones said.

“But I’m still practicing,” he added, smiling.


Claudia
Posts: 1448
Joined: Wed 14 Nov 2007 1:19
Location: Connecticut, USA

Re: Dr. Jones (Again)

Post by Claudia » Wed 6 Apr 2011 5:58

Jones began treating the disease’s symptoms in the late 1960s, before it was officially recognized by most medical professionals. When Yale doctors, led by then-Yale professor Allen Steere, worked to find the source of the disease in 1975, Jones gave the research team evidence by detailing the experiences of his own patients, lending Yale’s academic doctors a clinician’s perspective.
Jones told Steere from the very beginning that he felt that "Lyme Arthritis" was a bacterial infection because it responded to antibiotics in his pediatric patients, and for FIVE (5) years, even with clinical trials going on under Steere's supervision at Yale, Steere dismissed the effectiveness of antibiotics with his myopic insistence that it was viral. It was only after the discovery of the Bb spirochete that Steere acknowledge that antibiotics worked and are the treatment of choice!

I wonder how many children, like my son, have been seriously injured over the years by the under-treatment and non-treatment encouraged through the authority of Dr. Eugene Shapiro's "Lyme Hysteria" warnings.
“There is no benefit [to Jones’ long-term treatment], and there are expenses to both the individual and to society,” Shapiro told the News.
The denial of early, appropriate treatment (a $20 copay for a few weeks of generic doxy) when I first brought my son in to his pediatrician with a bulls-eye rash in 2001 has personally cost me, out of pocket, in uncovered, mainstream medical misdiagnosis and mistreatments, in lost wages, and extra college/educational expenses well over $150,000. The cost to society of my son's lost potential is unknowable and heartbreaking to me, never mind the cost of his lost childhood to him.

I hope that Dr. Jones had a good Birthday, I wish him all the best, and many more in good health.

LymeH
Posts: 290
Joined: Mon 1 Mar 2010 16:41

Re: Dr. Jones (Again)

Post by LymeH » Wed 6 Apr 2011 17:31

There was a very long discussion about Dr. Jones elsewhere on this site.

This article points out that even Dr. Jones admits to treating and diagnosing patients (more than once) sight unseen. It is reasonable for Dr. Shapiro to state that it is "very dangerous to treat a patient without proper evaluation".

Dr. Jones seems to indicate that he can not manage his own patient medical records. Medical records are important. They contain vital information that should be considered in determining the proper course of treatment for a patient. For Dr. Jones to excuse poor record-keeping with a comment that he and his staff "can only do so much" does not seem acceptable nor in the best, on-going interest of his patients.

Claudia, it sounds like you and your son have lived through a nightmare. I am very sorry for all the tragedy you both have been through. Your son is lucky to have someone like you involved in his care.

Physicians should be trained in the diagnosis of Lyme disease and early, adequate treatment to avoid any possible long-term complications. My experience is such that the LLMDs are not a reliable source of accurate diagnoses.

I ask you to consider that many LLMDs are treating well-beyond any standard of reason and endangering the lives of their patients. There is much more being practiced and experimented with on Lyme patients than the use of long-term antibiotics. Consideration and investigation should also be given to the possibility that some physicians intentionally prolong patient illness, and thus their treatment. Doctors need to be held accountable for their practices, good intentions are not enough.

There are so many different definitions of Lyme disease floating around that it is mind-blowing. The definition of Lyme and chronic Lyme along with the set of symptoms the infection can cause seems to be growing and spreading faster than any plague. With many doctors diagnosing every symptom du jour as chronic Lyme disease, it is surely a profitable business.

Claudia
Posts: 1448
Joined: Wed 14 Nov 2007 1:19
Location: Connecticut, USA

Re: Dr. Jones (Again)

Post by Claudia » Wed 6 Apr 2011 19:04

LymeHystorian wrote:

There was a very long discussion about Dr. Jones elsewhere on this site.

This article points out that even Dr. Jones admits to treating and diagnosing patients (more than once) sight unseen. It is reasonable for Dr. Shapiro to state that it is "very dangerous to treat a patient without proper evaluation".
If you scroll through that discussion you will see that this is a point I am in agreement with.
Dr. Jones seems to indicate that he can not manage his own patient medical records.
No, I don't think that this is an accurate conclusion.
Medical records are important. They contain vital information that should be considered in determining the proper course of treatment for a patient. For Dr. Jones to excuse poor record-keeping with a comment that he and his staff "can only do so much" does not seem acceptable nor in the best, on-going interest of his patients.
Yes. Agreed. However, there are degrees of human error and gross negligence, some grey areas don't you think? Some scale of magnitude? If not, I should have been fired from every job I've ever held. And then there are explanations and then there are excuses, it can be a very fine line... and I am glad judgment on my career didn't hang on the absolute interpretation of any given statement I may have made, at any given time, too.
I ask you to consider that many LLMDs are treating well-beyond any standard of reason and endangering the lives of their patients. There is much more being practiced and experimented with on Lyme patients than the use of long-term antibiotics. Consideration and investigation should also be given to the possibility that some physicians intentionally prolong patient illness, and thus their treatment. Doctors need to be held accountable for their practices, good intentions are not enough.
You must not have read too many of my posts on this forum, because you are preaching to the choir. I 100% agree. There are several prominent "llmds" that come to mind, but in my opinion Dr. Jones isn't one of them.

I also think that someone like Dr. Klinghardt or Dr. Horowitz are the flip side of the same coin as someone like Dr. Shapiro. They create and feed each other.
There are so many different definitions of Lyme disease floating around that it is mind-blowing. The definition of Lyme and chronic Lyme along with the set of symptoms the infection can cause seems to be growing and spreading faster than any plague. With many doctors diagnosing every symptom du jour as chronic Lyme disease, it is surely a profitable business.
I see that, and agree that it is a very real and serious problem.

LymeH
Posts: 290
Joined: Mon 1 Mar 2010 16:41

Re: Dr. Jones (Again)

Post by LymeH » Wed 6 Apr 2011 19:46

Dr. Jones seems to indicate that he can not manage his own patient medical records.
Claudia wrote:No, I don't think that this is an accurate conclusion.
Medical records are important. They contain vital information that should be considered in determining the proper course of treatment for a patient. For Dr. Jones to excuse poor record-keeping with a comment that he and his staff "can only do so much" does not seem acceptable nor in the best, on-going interest of his patients.
Claudia wrote:Yes. Agreed. However, there are degrees of human error and gross negligence, some grey areas don't you think? Some scale of magnitude? If not, I should have been fired from every job I've ever held. And then there are explanations and then there are excuses, it can be a very fine line... and I am glad judgment on my career didn't hang on the absolute interpretation of any given statement I may have made, at any given time, too.
I agree that there are degrees of error. Your points are well-made and well-received. I consider my own experiences when reading charges/allegations such as this made by the medical boards. However, I am not convinced that a medical board will charge a physician with misconduct or gross negligence based on a reasonable and customary amount of medical file mistakes.
ask you to consider that many LLMDs are treating well-beyond any standard of reason and endangering the lives of their patients. There is much more being practiced and experimented with on Lyme patients than the use of long-term antibiotics. Consideration and investigation should also be given to the possibility that some physicians intentionally prolong patient illness, and thus their treatment. Doctors need to be held accountable for their practices, good intentions are not enough.
Claudia wrote:You must not have read too many of my posts on this forum, because you are preaching to the choir. I 100% agree. There are several prominent "llmds" that come to mind, but in my opinion Dr. Jones isn't one of them.
I have read quite a few of your posts. The amount of understanding and compassion you show in your words has brought me to tears many times. This is one reason I find this whole subject frustrating at times. I do not know Dr. Jones, but I do know quite a few other LLMDs, too well, unfortunately.

Sometimes I will post a comment so that others may benefit or learn from reading it. I was aware I was preaching to the choir a bit here, but I left the comment for others to read.
Claudia wrote:I also think that someone like Dr. Klinghardt or Dr. Horowitz are the flip side of the same coin as someone like Dr. Shapiro. They create and feed each other.
What???? You don't want to follow the faimous protocol? You must prefer to drink your coffee. That's ok, send me $1,000 and I will cure you and your relatives of that elusive infection you may have contracted from that lone dust mite that looked at you cross-eyed 32 years ago, remember him? Don't stand near your microwave when you write me that check, either. I don't want any radiation poisoning. (For our readers, do not send money).
There are so many different definitions of Lyme disease floating around that it is mind-blowing. The definition of Lyme and chronic Lyme along with the set of symptoms the infection can cause seems to be growing and spreading faster than any plague. With many doctors diagnosing every symptom du jour as chronic Lyme disease, it is surely a profitable business.
Claudia wrote:I see that, and agree that it is a very real and serious problem.

Claudia
Posts: 1448
Joined: Wed 14 Nov 2007 1:19
Location: Connecticut, USA

Re: Dr. Jones (Again)

Post by Claudia » Sun 10 Apr 2011 17:22

LymeHystorian wrote:

Physicians should be trained in the diagnosis of Lyme disease and early, adequate treatment to avoid any possible long-term complications. My experience is such that the LLMDs are not a reliable source of accurate diagnoses.

LymeHystorian, this weekend I ran into a man from my neighborhood out on the wooded trails near our homes while we were out with our dogs. His property backs up to the trail and he cuts through the woods to get to the main path. He has a new puppy and brought up that he's pulled off a few ticks from her recently and I mentioned that both he and his wife should also check themselves, especially since they cut through wooded brush and leaf litter to get down to the path, that my son got Lyme disease and it has been a very serious illness for him.

He then told me about his Lyme disease experience last summer. He had been painting the outside of his house when he came down with flu symptoms. In the shower he proceeded to notice a bright red oval in his arm pit. His wife went online and found Lyme EM pictures that looked just like it and he made an appointment with his regular GP. The GP's office, to their credit, had him come right in. The GP looked at his rash and said that it was oval, not round, so it was not a Lyme rash and was a "heat rash." My neighbor reiterated that he felt very ill, just like he felt when he had the flu in the past, and that his wife found Lyme disease photos on the internet that looked just like the one he had. The GP got angry, pulled out a medical illustration and said "look, see these, these are round, these are Lyme rashes, your's is oval. It is not a Lyme rash." My neighbor stated that he wanted a blood test for Lyme to be sure. The GP said he did not need one. My neighbor told me that they actually had a heated argument back and forth and that when he insisted, said he'd go to his wife's GP or another doctor, the GP finally agreed to do a Lyme titer. To the GP's surprise, and the good fortune of his patient, the test came back positive and he was treated with antibiotics and has not had ill health problems since.

So, it was 2010, it's Connecticut, and here is a man, not a mother with "Lyme hysteria," nor a neurotic, bored, middle aged, suburban housewife with anxiety issues, with a similar story that continues to play out over and over, except he was one of the lucky ones with 'classic symptoms' that had a very early, positive antibody test.

Please, do you know what is being done to train and educate physicians in the early diagnosis of Lyme disease? As I've said, it was way back in July of 2001 when my son was infected and his pediatrician pulled out an official CDC medical illustration card to show me that a Lyme rash needed to be 5" inches or more across to be a "true Lyme EM," and therefore diagnosed my son with "an allergic reaction to a tick bite." When I argued for a test, expressed a better safe than sorry approach, I was told that "it would be negative," that if by some slim chance he did go on to develop Lyme disease, that it would be "easy to treat at any time with antibiotics." It was years later I learned that it was Spring of 2001, a few months before my son came into the office, when the CDC/NIH sent out their official medical alert to physicians about "mother's with Lyme hysteria," which clearly explained our pediatrician's eye roll and exasperated comment to me about "you mother's with Lyme hysteria."

Please, is good, reliable physician education and training about Lyme disease now receiving the same effort and attention that the bad LLMD's receive, and their serious problem of over-diagnosis and over-treatment, do you know?

While two wrongs don't make a right, my experience is such that often physicians are not a reliable source of accurate diagnoses, or treatment, too.

Camp Other
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Re: Dr. Jones (Again)

Post by Camp Other » Mon 11 Apr 2011 6:49

LymeHystorian wrote:

Physicians should be trained in the diagnosis of Lyme disease and early, adequate treatment to avoid any possible long-term complications. My experience is such that the LLMDs are not a reliable source of accurate diagnoses.
I think they should be trained in the diagnosis of Lyme disease and be able to give people early and adequate treatment too - as one would hope that would be the best way to avoid the possibility of long-term consequences. It's a hope, though, because inadequate early treatment can lead to the same problems that no treatment does.

If you are a physician, under these circumstances I don't think it's that easy to determine that Lyme disease is what a patient is ill with at first glance - especially if no rash can be found and the patient does not recall a tick bite. There might have been a rash on one's head under the hair or a spot they or someone else didn't see, like the fold under one's buttock. Flu-like symptoms without a positive blood test will most likely be viewed as a viral infection at this point, unless symptoms become more intense and general CBC tests confirm signs of infection that antibiotics are called for.

The fact that blood tests for Lyme disease often are not positive right after the bite means physicians have to rely on the patient's recall - their history - and clinical diagnosis in order to catch and treat the infection early. But it's not that easy to do so. Other than than frequently touted profit involved in vaccines, there are practical reasons behind wanting to create a vaccine for Lyme disease that works. This difficulty with early diagnosis is one of them. From what I know, infectious disease specialists and researchers in the field know that Lyme disease without early treatment can lead to complications and they don't want people to suffer from them - a huge percentage of them just disagree with much of the patient community as to the cause of those complications.

Claudia's example is a sad indictment on one doctor's adherence to textbook doctoring. A rash such as the one described plus flu-like symptoms should be a lightbulb moment to rule Lyme disease in - not out. With all the available information on EM rashes out there, doctors should already be educated on the fact that EMs can take on somewhat different appearances, and may look different on dark skin. Even without the rash, a good clinician - a good diagnostician - will look at the patient's symptoms and history, including recent activities and might (might) know if an area someone has visited is endemic for tickborne infections - but not always.

From what I know, physicians in endemic areas are not always aware their practices are in an endemic area or think to ask if their patients traveled to an endemic area recently. The reports I've received from patients on the west coast and the south tell me that their state health departments know more than their doctors do about how widespread infected ticks are in their region. Somehow... somewhere along the line, there has been a huge disconnect between what the epidemiologists and entomologists know - and what the doctors know... especially with Lyme disease being the fastest growing vector based disease in the US.

For better or for worse, LLMDs have ended up taking on patients who may have had exactly the experience Claudia's neighbor had - except without the successful ending of getting their doctor to give the blood test. Fortunately, the doctor did finally agreed to give her neighbor a blood test - but only after saying he'd just go elsewhere to get the test. Given the symptoms shown and history, I have to wonder why the doctor was so dismissive of the request for a blood test - and if any apology was given by the doctor later.

My own experience is that my ex (and ex for a good reason) primary care physician did not think one could get Lyme disease where I was bitten. And I sat there, in the office with this huge oval rash on me. I lived in an endemic area yet the doctor did not think it was an endemic area. Strange. The CDC thinks it is an endemic area. Others do, too. When your own doctor doesn't know what the CDC does, that is another sign of some sort of disconnect.

I did eventually find an LLMD after going through the usual channels first. I wasn't so sure about seeing an LLMD at first, but I began to get sicker than I'd ever been in my entire life and knew something had to be done. Fortunately I found a doctor who was willing to treat me based on what I think is mostly sound methodology and cautious process. My LLMD doesn't try to dump every protocol and unproven treatment on me because it's in vogue or other patients are asking for it. My LLMD treats me based on my test tesults and my clinical picture. And that's it.

I've gotten better than I was, but I'm not completely well. If my brain works, and the pain isn't severe - I can deal. I've learned to live with a certain amount of pain, though I miss my old life without it. It's once it reaches a certain threshold that I begin swearing and wondering why I'm here.

I think that some of the LLMDs are there to cash in on the chronically ill, and others genuinely care about what they do and care about their patients and at least see Lyme disease and coinfections where other physicians did not - and are correct. (This would apply to both non-ILADS and ILADS LLMDs, which are all of varying skill, experience, background, and motivation.) If other physicians saw what they did early on and ruled tickborne diseases in more often, then perhaps there would be fewer problems for patients - in fact, I'm sure there would be fewer problems for patients.

But I can't say that there wouldn't be any problems... One has to know what they are looking at really early on. If there is early dissemination to the CNS and brain, 100 mg doxycycline bid is not going to cut it - IV antibiotics are needed, and additional treatment if a coinfection is involved. Early treatment will be inadequate if the infection has already hit further up the line, and sometimes I suspect this might be part of why some Lyme disease cases end up with persisting symptoms.

minitails2
Posts: 1001
Joined: Sat 3 Nov 2007 10:27

Re: Dr. Jones (Again)

Post by minitails2 » Tue 12 Apr 2011 6:52

L.H.

You wrote:
I ask you to consider that many LLMDs are treating well-beyond any standard of reason and endangering the lives of their patients. There is much more being practiced and experimented with on Lyme patients than the use of long-term antibiotics. Consideration and investigation should also be given to the possibility that some physicians intentionally prolong patient illness, and thus their treatment. Doctors need to be held accountable for their practices, good intentions are not enough.
I think you need to learn to differentiate between real lyme doctors who treat lyme, and doctor/naturapths, etc who treat the "terrain" like Klinghardt and his assinine obssesion with metals, toxins, and the like. It's easy to see the difference between the types of doctors. The doctor who treated me, one you have made nasty comments about in the past, has cured me, not just made me feel better. I have no pain, etc, took no weird supplements, or actually any at all, so from one who has kicked lyme disease (unless it cares to kick me back) maybe you need a little more perspective. You know little about llmds or the treatment of lyme. I don't know what your thing is, but you sure are on some kind of crusade.

You wrote:
However, I am not convinced that a medical board will charge a physician with misconduct or gross negligence based on a reasonable and customary amount of medical file mistakes.
This is based on what knowledge of medicine, state boards, the politics of each state, the politics of the individuals involved in state boards, national trends affecting different diseases, how much attention each case gets, and on and on. You have every right to state your opinion but don't pretend you know more than you do. You could no sooner come up with the answers to the questions I listed about CT than I could do a heart transplant. You don't seem to have had lyme so I just don't understand your intolerance with anything lyme. Maybe it's time for you to admit you're not a lyme patient, you aren't a caretaker, and no one in your family has lyme. Maybe your obessesion with lyme is harmful to you. Just a thought. Good luck.

LymeH
Posts: 290
Joined: Mon 1 Mar 2010 16:41

Re: Dr. Jones (Again) - Need Money

Post by LymeH » Fri 29 Apr 2011 15:51

This is topic Look at the Speaker list for this program in forum Medical Questions at LymeNet Flash.


To visit this topic, use this URL:
http://flash.lymenet.org/ubb/ultimatebb ... c/1/106704

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Posted by Tincup (Member # 5829) on 04-26-2011 12:17 AM04-26-2011 12:17 AM:

Couldn't have a better program! And those University researchers are just the best!

AND.. it's free!!

`````````````````````````````````````````

SAVE THE DATE

“Breakthroughs in Lyme Disease Research”

Join us to hear our news --- the latest findings of the
Lyme Disease Research Group at the University of New Haven

Saturday May 21, 1PM ~ 8PM

University of New Haven ~ Dodds Theatre
300 Boston Post Road, West Haven, CT 06516

~ Free and Open to the Public ~

Speakers to include:

Dr Charles Ray Jones- Keynote speaker

Dr Joseph Burrascano – “Recent Research Breakthroughs in Lyme Disease”

Dr Eva Sapi – “Evaluation of in vitro antibiotic susceptibility of different morphological forms of Borrelia burgdorferi”

Graduate Thesis Research Projects:

David Luecke – “Unraveling Unique Features of Borrelia burgdorferi Biofilm”

Amy Rattelle – “Evaluation of Matrix Requirement for Borrelia burgdorferi Biofilm Form”

Yram Foli – “Antimicrobial Effects of Medicinal Aromatic Oils on the Different Morphological Forms of Borrelia burgdorferi”

Namrata Pabbati MS – “Novel filarial Nematode Infection in Ixodes Scapularis ticks Collected in Southern Connecticut”

A panel discussion and networking reception will follow the presentations.

Special fundraising options will be available in support of the Dr. Charles Ray Jones Legal Defense fund


Further information: http://www.newhaven.edu/lyme

The University of New Haven is a private, top-tier comprehensive institution recognized as a national leader in experiential education.

Founded in 1920, the University provides its students with a unique combination of a solid liberal arts education and real-world, hands-on professional training.

UNH's approximately 6,000 students select from more than 100 undergraduate and graduate degree offerings in the arts and sciences, business, criminal justice, engineering and forensic sciences.

This year, U.S. News and World Report magazine named UNH among the top-tier regional universities in the North in its annual "America's Best Colleges" rankings.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Posted by Lymetoo (Member # 743) on 04-26-2011 11:31 AM04-26-2011 11:31 AM:

NICE!!


LymeH
Posts: 290
Joined: Mon 1 Mar 2010 16:41

Re: Dr. Jones (Again)

Post by LymeH » Wed 11 May 2011 21:31

minitails2 wrote:L.H.

You wrote:
I ask you to consider that many LLMDs are treating well-beyond any standard of reason and endangering the lives of their patients. There is much more being practiced and experimented with on Lyme patients than the use of long-term antibiotics. Consideration and investigation should also be given to the possibility that some physicians intentionally prolong patient illness, and thus their treatment. Doctors need to be held accountable for their practices, good intentions are not enough.
I think you need to learn to differentiate between real lyme doctors who treat lyme, and doctor/naturapths, etc who treat the "terrain" like Klinghardt and his assinine obssesion with metals, toxins, and the like. It's easy to see the difference between the types of doctors.


What is a "real" Lyme doctor? I did not say that all LLMDs have sub-specialties as you describe like "Klinghardt and his assinine [sic] obsseion [sic] with metals, toxins, and the like."
minitails2 wrote:The doctor who treated me, one you have made nasty comments about in the past, has cured me, not just made me feel better.


Which protocol does this doctor follow? In the future, it would be helpful if you were more specific as to which objection you are objecting.

I will not turn this into another long and exhausting argument, if that is what you enjoy. I speak from experience. I do not even object to alternative or natural medicines, in fact many prescription medications are derived from natural sources. I merely think it is important that doctors (LLMD or otherwise) not endanger and exploit their patients.
minitails2 wrote:You know little about llmds or the treatment of lyme. I don't know what your thing is, but you sure are on some kind of crusade.
You do not know the depth of my knowledge or experience. You are making unfounded statements. I do not need to explain or justify why I am interested in this topic.
minitails2 wrote: You don't seem to have had lyme so I just don't understand your intolerance with anything lyme. Maybe it's time for you to admit you're not a lyme patient, you aren't a caretaker, and no one in your family has lyme.
It seems that you are trying to present yourself as an expert in Lyme. If you are a Lyme disease expert and are in fact saying that I don't have Lyme, never had Lyme, and no one in my family has ever had Lyme, then I would like to get that in writing please.

(Edited for typo and clarity of last paragraph)
Last edited by LymeH on Thu 12 May 2011 15:15, edited 1 time in total.

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