Information about microscopy (for the member who asked)

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Information about microscopy (for the member who asked)

Post by X-member » Thu 5 Jul 2012 1:02

Dark field microscopy:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dark_field_microscopy

Phase contrast microscopy

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phase_contrast

Both the above can be used to see the Lyme bacteria.

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You can find some films of the Lyme bacteria in live blood in the topic below:

"Dr. Bela P. Bozsik (Hungary)"

http://www.lymeneteurope.org/forum/view ... =11&t=3639

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I have also had a question how to make the "white" parts green, and this can be done in (at least) two ways.

Here is one way:

"Fluorescence microscope"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fluorescence_microscope

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The other way is to send the pictures to someone that want to publish them, but want the "white" parts to be seen better, and therefore change the "white" colour to green. ;)

And that is how some of my dark field pictures (that I have used as an avatar in this forum) became green. :D

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"Video-microscopy and pictures of Borrelia burgdorferi and other spirochete like structures links collection"

http://lymerick.net/videomicroscopy.htm

A quote from the link above:
Dr. Bozsik found – data extracted from his Diagnosis lecture– that:

1. Spirochetes could be demonstrated in BLOOD by dark-field microscopy during all ACTIVE stages of pathogenesis!

2. 107 of 143 (75%) of the cases with live (moving) spirochetes found in their blood by dark-field microscopy, were confirmed by real-time PCR to belong to Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato
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My (and other people's) experiences:

It is easier to find the borrelia bacteria in live blood, and harder to find them on smears.

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http://lymerick.net/MacDonald-images.html
Alan MacDonald's answer to why so many pictures and so little text on his website: http://www.molecularalzheimer.org

"I am hospital pathologist by trade and my world is microscopic images.
Daily I diagnose health and disease based on the image profiles from surgically
removed tissues and blood smears and microbiology specimens.
In my research, which I do at might or on the weekends as energy permits,
I interpret images from diseased tissues.

In hospital pathology, there are many texts which illustrate the image profiles
of tumors and other medical diseases.
Some of the reference materials do not provide a “perfect” image match to
an Individual patient situation.
New Lessons which come from patients which do not “match” the published
image archive are the subject of “case reports” which enrich and expand the
knowledge “contained in Textbooks”.

Many of the Images of ”spirochetes” in textbooks demonstrate only the
“perfect corkscrew” profile — leading a reader to “doubt’ the legitimacy of
cystic or granular forms and the reject cell wall deficient ‘LForms”

My Website is an effort to Educate visitors about the “forgotten” spirochetal
forms which are Really Borrelia and which exist in diseased tissues."

Dr MacDonald is a member in this forum and have posted very much interesting information and very many pictures. 8-)

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From another member in this forum:

http://counsellingme.com/microscopy/introduction.html

A quote:
Microscopy Introduction

The following pages describe how I used a microscope to see and film bacteria in a tiny drop of blood.
Last edited by X-member on Sat 21 Jul 2012 17:06, edited 1 time in total.



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Re: Information about microscopy (for the member who asked)

Post by X-member » Sat 21 Jul 2012 17:06

Information about microscopy (from Wikipedia):

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microscopy

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Re: Information about microscopy (for the member who asked)

Post by Camp Other » Mon 23 Jul 2012 4:17

There are many different spirochetes out there, and in taking a sample, one has to differentiate between, say, oral Treponemes and Borrelia. To some degree this can be determined by visual measurement of the circumference and length of the bacteria - but fluorescence is what I see as being the best way to view them and getting a DNA analysis for confirmation is best for determining what you have.

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Re: Information about microscopy (for the member who asked)

Post by Camp Other » Mon 23 Jul 2012 4:55

Also:

To tell difference between spirochetes, try staining with species-specific monoclonal antibody and using IFA.

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Re: Information about microscopy (for the member who asked)

Post by X-member » Mon 23 Jul 2012 17:42

More information about my microscope and so on can be found in the topic/posts below:

http://www.lymeneteurope.org/forum/view ... =20#p30206

A quote:

Carina:
I have a dark field microscope with a magnification up to 1 500 x, and a camera for it.

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Re: Information about microscopy (for the member who asked)

Post by X-member » Tue 24 Jul 2012 0:14

Peter Kemp has posted some interesting information in the topic below:

http://www.lymeneteurope.org/forum/view ... led#p27484

A quote:
I just tried staining with malachite green and it appears to be taken up well by many round-bodies and wouldn't wash off, but I need to set-up a brightfield scope to confirm this.

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Re: Information about microscopy (for the member who asked)

Post by X-member » Tue 24 Jul 2012 1:20

A lot of information is found on the link (from Dr Marie Kroun, Denmark) below:

http://lymerick.net/Borrelia-culture.html

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Re: Information about microscopy (for the member who asked)

Post by X-member » Thu 20 Sep 2012 15:58

"Chronic persistent Lyme Disease (LD) or chronic Borreliosis"

http://www.borreliose-nachrichten.de/wp ... liosis.pdf

A quote:
In case of a chronic infection, it can take several hours or even days until they* are visible under the microscope, as they “slip out” of the cells (erythrocytes and macrophages).
* The spirochetes

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