What's in YOUR weather forecast? Preparing for Sandy

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Cobwebby
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Joined: Mon 29 Oct 2007 0:55

What's in YOUR weather forecast? Preparing for Sandy

Post by Cobwebby » Sat 27 Oct 2012 20:46

A year after being walloped by Hurricane Irene, residents rushed to put away boats, harvest crops and sandbag boardwalks as the Eastern Seaboard braced for a rare megastorm that experts said would cause much greater havoc.

Hurricane Sandy, moving north from the Caribbean, remained a Category 1 hurricane early Saturday, and was expected to make landfall Monday night near the Delaware coast.

"Do not focus on the intensity of the storm, it is a minimal category 1 hurricane right now, but certainly nothing like any category1 that we have seen," said Hurricane Specialist Carl Parker on The Weather Channel. "It is a very large storm, a hybrid storm, the area of strong winds is going to be absolutely enormous by the time it come into the northeast, and that’s why it is going to be a high-impact system."

Sandy is expected to interact with a pair of winter weather systems as it moves inland, becoming a monster storm bringing nearly a foot of rain, high winds and up to 2 feet of snow. Experts said the storm would be wider and stronger than last year's Irene, which caused more than $15 billion in damage, and could rival the worst East Coast storm on record.
Last edited by Cobwebby on Sat 27 Oct 2012 20:52, edited 1 time in total.
The greater part of our happiness or misery
depends on our dispositions,
and not on our circumstances.
Martha Washington

Cobwebby
Posts: 1716
Joined: Mon 29 Oct 2007 0:55

Re: What's in YOUR weather forecast?

Post by Cobwebby » Sat 27 Oct 2012 20:52

I do believe the only inconvienience I personally will encounter is loss of power.
But there will still be activities to do. I can knit, put a jigsaw together,write letters (!), read, I always make a special trip to the library before a storm. If others chose to stay over of course I will have company-nice. I think living off the grid for a few days will be good for me. I am prepared. :D
The greater part of our happiness or misery
depends on our dispositions,
and not on our circumstances.
Martha Washington

RitaA
Posts: 2768
Joined: Thu 1 Jul 2010 8:33

Re: What's in YOUR weather forecast? Preparing for Sandy

Post by RitaA » Sat 27 Oct 2012 22:12

Take care, Cobwebby. Depending on where you live, you could potentially be without power for one or two weeks, so I hope you have lots of candles, batteries and other supplies on hand.

My biggest personal concern at the moment is for my mother and step-father. They are feeling quite anxious after what they went through last year when tropical storm Irene caught people in Vermont off guard. They evacuated their house just in time -- within 10 minutes of a nearby bridge being closed when a relatively small creek had become a torrent of raging water. That flood water filled their basement, coming within two inches of reaching the first floor.

Although everything in the basement and most of the contents of the garage were a write-off, my parents got off easier than some of their neighbours. They called the Holiday Inn home for two weeks while my brothers (who live in Montreal and southeastern New Hampshire) cleaned up most of the mess -- once they could get there, that is. There was no road access to their community until two days after the storm, and even that was limited.

I was watching the extensive media coverage of possible flooding in New York City last year when Chad Myers of CNN mentioned a flash flood warning for some parts of Vermont -- including the county where my mother lives. I was on the phone within seconds, and it's a good thing I called. My mother was totally unaware of the possible danger she was in, and tried to reassure me that they would be fine. It was during my third phone call (yes, I can be persistent) that my mother finally noticed the brown floodwater creeping up her backyard. There is a farmer's cornfield and a bit of forest between her backyard and the creek, so she couldn't see the rising water until it was almost too late to take action. Thankfully a volunteer in their community was brave enough to risk getting stranded herself when she crossed the bridge to drive my parents to a safe location.

There are already casualties from Hurricane Sandy in the Caribbean, and I don't doubt this storm is going to cause a lot more devastation and inconvenience in the coming days. It looks like folks along the eastern seaboard, and especially New Jersey, are in for quite a wallop.

Stay safe, everyone!

Rita

Cobwebby
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Re: What's in YOUR weather forecast? Preparing for Sandy

Post by Cobwebby » Sun 28 Oct 2012 3:16

one or two weeks without power- that's a bit much for me-one or two days is sufficient. Just got a robo call from my employment that no work on Sun/Mon with rest of week to be determined. Interesting that the entire state of Maryland fits into the projected swath of the storm.

So,Rita, have you already called your parents about this storm?
The greater part of our happiness or misery
depends on our dispositions,
and not on our circumstances.
Martha Washington

Cobwebby
Posts: 1716
Joined: Mon 29 Oct 2007 0:55

Re: What's in YOUR weather forecast? Preparing for Sandy

Post by Cobwebby » Sun 28 Oct 2012 3:19

Claudia? I guess you must be out looking for D batteries-sold out in MD.

What I meant to get, but didn't was a small charcoal grill. What a hoot if this storm heads out to sea!
The greater part of our happiness or misery
depends on our dispositions,
and not on our circumstances.
Martha Washington

Lorima
Posts: 914
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Re: What's in YOUR weather forecast? Preparing for Sandy

Post by Lorima » Sun 28 Oct 2012 3:56

I'm just outside Boston. Lots of big old trees in our neighborhood, I hope they can stand up to it.
Keep safe,
Lorima
"I have to understand the world, you see."
Richard Feynman

RitaA
Posts: 2768
Joined: Thu 1 Jul 2010 8:33

Re: What's in YOUR weather forecast? Preparing for Sandy

Post by RitaA » Sun 28 Oct 2012 4:59

Cobwebby wrote:one or two weeks without power- that's a bit much for me-one or two days is sufficient. Just got a robo call from my employment that no work on Sun/Mon with rest of week to be determined. Interesting that the entire state of Maryland fits into the projected swath of the storm.

So,Rita, have you already called your parents about this storm?
I think your employer is being very wise, Cobwebby. I hope you don't lose power for even one day, but long interruptions in service have been known to happen.

Yes, I spoke to my mother yesterday, and will be touching base with her again tomorrow morning. I need to let her know that southern Vermont is already under a flood watch -- which is really only a head's up for people to monitor the situation. A flood warning means people need to start paying very close attention and have an exit strategy in mind should conditions quickly worsen. My stepfather has been feeling rather anxious since he first heard about the storm. He is 92 years old, legally blind, has a serious heart condition and mild dementia. Any change to his routine and surroundings is especially difficult for my step-dad, and that's completely understandable.

We went through the hurricane/tropical storm preparation list (on CNN's website) yesterday, and my parents already have a bag packed in case they need to leave the house on short notice. Although they now have a generator should they lose electricity, there is currently only enough fuel in it to last for about 12 hours -- which means getting them more fuel could become a high priority on very short notice. There's only a small window for doing this: too soon, and the gas could be wasted, but waiting too long could mean the bridge/roads are impassable and gas stations are closed. I'll need to keep a close watch on the weather forecast for southern Vermont, and keep my fingers crossed that phone service isn't cut off. I'm the family "communications officer" at times like this, and not being able to communicate with my parents and siblings (in Montreal and New Hampshire) makes it much more difficult for everyone involved.

Cobwebby, I do hope you're able to ride out the storm without any untoward events. Please do keep us posted if you're able.

Rita

Updated on Sunday afternoon (Oct. 28th) ~ 1:30 pm EST:

A very kind neighbour showed up at my parents' door, offering to help in any way possible. He picked up enough gas to fill up the generator and for them to have a small reserve. That's a relief given the following forecast for their area:
A HIGH WIND WARNING...WHICH IS IN EFFECT FROM 2 PM MONDAY TO 11 AM EDT TUESDAY.

IMPACTS...SCATTERED TO WIDESPREAD DOWNED TREES AND POWERLINES ARE LIKELY...RESULTING IN POWER OUTAGES. IN ADDITION MINOR STRUCTURAL DAMAGE TO POORLY CONSTRUCTED HOMES OR BUILDINGS IS EXPECTED
Our family is all set. I hope everyone else is prepared as well.
Last edited by RitaA on Sun 28 Oct 2012 18:41, edited 2 times in total.

RitaA
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Joined: Thu 1 Jul 2010 8:33

Re: What's in YOUR weather forecast? Preparing for Sandy

Post by RitaA » Sun 28 Oct 2012 5:08

Lorima wrote:I'm just outside Boston. Lots of big old trees in our neighborhood, I hope they can stand up to it.
Keep safe,
Lorima
I hope those big old trees stay put too for your sake and everyone else in your neighbourhood. I've been reading about frantic efforts in several states to cut down dead tree branches -- and sometimes entire trees themselves -- to prevent them from bringing down power lines and/or damaging homes and cars when the winds pick up.

With last year's storm (at least in Vermont), entire trees were uprooted because the ground became too wet for the roots to stay anchored -- and especially when trees ended up completely submerged. Let's hope that doesn't happen in the Boston area or anywhere else, but I suspect there may be a bit of that going on in the coming days.

Stay safe, and please let us know how you make out.

Rita

RitaA
Posts: 2768
Joined: Thu 1 Jul 2010 8:33

Re: What's in YOUR weather forecast? Preparing for Sandy

Post by RitaA » Sun 28 Oct 2012 6:42

http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/refresh/graphic ... e#contents


http://www.wunderground.com/blog/angela ... ntrynum=29
Posted by: Angela Fritz, 12:18 AM GMT on October 28, 2012

Hurricane Sandy is now the 2nd largest tropical cyclone in the Atlantic since 1988, tied with Hurricane Lili of 1996. Sandy's tropical storm-force winds now extend 450 nautical miles from the center on the northeast side of the hurricane. This is a very, very large storm, and I suspect the #1 spot (Olga of 2001) is in jeopardy, as well.

http://www.wunderground.com/blog/bnorcr ... ntrynum=20
Sandy on Track - But Is the Message Getting Out?

Posted by: Bryan Norcross, 3:44 AM GMT on October 28, 2012

[snip]

If the center of the circulation lands on the Jersey Shore, as looks most likely, the focus on that energy is going to be on North Jersey, New York Harbor, and the south shore of Long Island. The National Weather Service in New York is predicting waves 10 to 20 feet high on the south-facing beaches. Holy crap!

Did I also mention that's on top of the storm surge, which is forecast to raise the ocean level 4 to 8 feet above normal? And did I also mention that there's a full moon and the storm's peak is expected to be around high tide? Holy triple whammy!

[snip]

There will be a whole lot of talk about this when the storm is over. Hopefully that will result in a communication policy that meets the world-class standards of the forecasting that goes on at the Hurricane Center and at Weather Service offices all over the country.

The bottom line... let's all get on the same page. The forecast calls for a massive, destructive storm to affect tens of millions of people. If the forecast is wrong, hooray. But so far it's been right, and the odds are this is going to be really bad for a lot of people. Everybody's goal should be to be sure that as many people as possible are as ready and aware as they can be.

RitaA
Posts: 2768
Joined: Thu 1 Jul 2010 8:33

Re: What's in YOUR weather forecast? Preparing for Sandy

Post by RitaA » Sun 28 Oct 2012 8:19

http://www.cnn.com/2012/08/27/us/hurric ... le_sidebar
Keep a hurricane preparation checklist

By the CNN Wire Staff

updated 12:20 PM EDT, Fri October 26, 2012
http://www.cnn.com/2012/08/29/health/hu ... index.html
Hurricane safety: When the lights go out

By Ann J. Curley and Ashley Hayes, CNN

updated 12:09 PM EDT, Fri October 26, 2012

(CNN) -- Hurricane shutters, water jugs and batteries are not the only things to consider when extreme weather threatens the coast.

Power outages and evacuations can pose safety issues, especially for those managing chronic illnesses

Here are some tips to stay healthy when the lights go out:

Managing your medications

The elderly and chronically ill need to take note of their medications when the power goes out. Insulin and some liquid medications may require cooling, says Dr. David Seaburg, president of the American College of Emergency Physicians. Lunch bags containing a cool pack are a good option for those products.

For those facing evacuation, it's important to have a record -- either a piece of paper or a computer accessible file -- with the names and dosage information of your prescription drugs. Ideally, it should be prepared in advance.

For diabetics, a supply of snacks is essential, along with insulin and any other medications, says Dr. David Ross, a Colorado Springs, Colorado, emergency physician who assisted victims of the Waldo Canyon Fire this summer.

Ross also suggests that people have an emergency one-month supply of prescription medications, so they will not be caught short-handed.

[snip]
http://www.cnn.com/2012/08/30/living/mn ... le_sidebar
How to include pets in your family emergency plan

By Morieka Johnson, MNN.com

updated 3:23 PM EDT, Thu August 30, 2012
The CDC provides links to some very helpful and detailed information. Your individual state may also have similar resources:

http://emergency.cdc.gov/disasters/hurricanes/
Hurricanes

INCLUDING CYCLONES, TYPHOONS & OTHER TROPICAL STORMS
http://emergency.cdc.gov/disasters/mold/reenter.asp
Reentering Your Flooded Home

When returning to a home that’s been flooded after natural disasters such as hurricanes, tornadoes, and floods, be aware that your house may be contaminated with mold or sewage, which can cause health risks for your family.

When You First Reenter Your Home

•If you have standing water in your home and can turn off the main power from a dry location, then go ahead and turn off the power, even if it delays cleaning. If you must enter standing water to access the main power switch, then call an electrician to turn it off. NEVER turn power on or off yourself or use an electric tool or appliance while standing in water.
•Have an electrician check the house’s electrical system before turning the power on again.
• If the house has been closed up for several days, enter briefly to open doors and windows to let the house air out for awhile (at least 30 minutes) before you stay for any length of time.
•If your home has been flooded and has been closed up for several days, presume your home has been contaminated with mold. (See Protect Yourself from Mold.)
•If your home has been flooded, it also may be contaminated with sewage. (See After a Hurricane or Flood: Cleanup of Flood Water.)[snip]
http://emergency.cdc.gov/disasters/floo ... pwater.asp
Flood Water After a Disaster or Emergency

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